Advertised Project Openings


Below are currently advertised UROP projects available to eligible undergraduates. All projects, regardless of mode (pay, credit, or volunteer) are expected to be worth MIT academic credit and be supervised by MIT faculty. Projects appear on this list in the order they have been received.

These projects do not represent all available UROPs as many faculty do not submit project listings for this site. Rather, they expect interested students to contact them based on their general research to discuss potential UROPs.

Available UROPs

11/21/17

IAP/Spring

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Materials Processing Center (MPC)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Lionel C. Kimerling

Project Title: Educational Games - Integrated Photonics Virtual Lab

Project Description: Are you interested in educational game development? Would you like to explore how to use simulations and games to help students learn about photonics and electronics? In this project UROPs will develop code for an online virtual laboratory that teaches students about the emerging field of integrated photonics. UROPs will also help design 2D and 3D simulations, as well as assess the effectiveness of these tools in college-level courses and for technician training.

Our team will provide regular guidance and mentoring to help UROPs develop visually creative interfaces that represent the function and limitations of various photonic materials and devices.

Sponsored research funding available, with 20-30 hours per week anticipated during IAP. During Spring term, preference will be given to applicants who can commit ~10 hours per week. For sophomores and juniors, this position could be open to a longer-term commitment.

Prerequisites: Students should have a fairly strong background in computer programming. Familiarity with C# and the Unity 3D game development platform is a plus.

Contact: Dr. Erik Verlage: everlage@mit.edu


11/21/17

IAP/Spring

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Comparative Media Studies (21 CMS)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Eric Klopfer

Project Title: TaleBlazer Software Developer – Location-based Augmented Reality on Smartphones

Project Description: Interested in location-based technology? Interested in games?  Want to play with smartphones? Apply to work on TaleBlazer for credit as a UROP or UAP! TaleBlazer is a location-based Augmented Reality game creation platform. Game designers build interactive games using the TaleBlazer Editor web application.  Similar to Starlogo TNG, Scratch or App Inventor, the TaleBlazer Editor includes a blocks-based programming environment that allows the game designer to specify the game logic.

Game players use the TaleBlazer mobile application to download and play TaleBlazer games on GPS enabled smartphones (Android or iOS).  As the players move around the real world, they meet virtual characters or objects in the game world that the game designers have built for them.

TaleBlazer is intended for educational purposes – the players explore subject matter in a new and exciting way in a real world context. We have worked with zoos, schools, after-school clubs, etc. to design and launch various professionally developed games with science, math, and history content.  The TaleBlazer Editor can also be a valuable teaching and learning tool for student game designers, who learn programming skills and game design, while delving deeply into subject matter to create games about specific topics.

Technology: The TaleBlazer Mobile application is built using Appcelerator Studio, a 3rd party toolkit which allows the programmer to write a single codebase in JavaScript that is then compiled into native iOS and Android applications.  The TaleBlazer website is based on a CakePHP/MySQL backend with a JavaScript/HTML/CSS frontend.

A single semester position for the Spring semester 2018 is available. Candidate may start work during IAP if desired.

Project ideas include:

  • Map Improvements - rework main interface to add ability to rotate 'static' map and zoom in/out and make other usability enhancements.
  • Data Collection - allow players to take photos and/or add notes during gameplay.  Use your keen UI design skills and your mobile-user expertise to design and implement a meaningful way for players to collect and review their data.
  • Feature Enhancements - help make TaleBlazer more usable by adding some highly requested features such as the ability to control sound effects, etc.

Prerequisites: While these positions require a strong programming background, experience with specific programming languages is not required. Availability to work majority of hours during business hours at the STEP Lab is required.

Relevant URL: taleblazer.org

Apply: If you are interested in this position, please send an email to tea-jobs@mit.edu and include:

  • an overview of your programming experience (specific references to relevant courses and other development and programming projects would be very helpful) including any pertinent URLs
  • please specify which position(s) you are interested in
  • a summary of any previous UROP and work experience (attach a resume if you have one)
  • a short description of why you are interested in working on this project
  • Please put "TaleBlazer" in the subject line

11/21/17

IAP/Spring

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Comparative Media Studies (21 CMS)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name:  Eric Klopfer

Project Title: Virtual reality and games for STEM learning

Project Description: Are you curious about how to use virtual reality, simulations, and games to help students understand and imagine careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) subjects? In this project, you will work closely with TSL research scientists to understand the current research about using technology based solutions in high school classrooms. We are currently working on a game for 9th grade biology students in which students will be able to explore a cell using an Oculus Rift headset. UROPs will help assimilate research on students’ conceptions in biology, effectiveness and strategies for using 2D, 3D, and 3D VR simulations in educational games, and fostering collaboration in those environments. Sponsored research funding available. Specific end of UROP goal: Understand current research in educational games that involve collaboration and virtual reality simulations.

Contact: If you are interested in this position, please send an email to Cindy Sambataro csambata@mit.edu and include:

  • an overview of your research experience (specific references to courses and other projects or experiences would be very helpful) including any pertinent URLs
  • a summary of any previous UROP and work experience (attach a resume if you have one)
  • the number of hours you could work on the project
  • a short description of why you are interested in working on this project
  • Please put the title of the project in the subject line of your email
  • Please indicate whether you are looking for IAP or spring or both IAP and spring, and whether you are seeking a UROP for credit or for pay.

11/21/17

IAP/Spring

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Comparative Media Studies (21 CMS)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Justin Reich

Project Title: MicroMasters Program Research and Evaluation

Project Description: MicroMasters is a professional and academic credential for online learners from anywhere in the world. Learners who pass an integrated set of MITx graduate-level courses on edX.org, and one or more proctored exams, will earn a MicroMasters credential from MITx, and can then apply for an accelerated, on campus, master’s degree program at MIT or other top universities. The very first blended cohort of the Supply Chain Management MicroMasters will be on campus this fall, and we are starting a research project to investigate the experience of learners in both the traditional and blended programs, their level of preparation, and other aspects of the program with the ultimate goal of preparing an advisory report to the SCM program and to the university about the future of MicroMasters. Researchers on this project will help conduct interviews, design and deliver surveys, and evaluate other forms of data.  Sponsored research funding available.

Specific end of UROP goal: Design and create game bundles on different STEM topics for ELK, design new versions of games to help teachers become more effective in building on what students know.

Address letter to: Justin Reich jreich@mit.edu

Contact: Please send a resume and a brief cover letter via email to csambata@mit.edu.  Please indicate which project(s) you would be interested in and describe how your experience or interests would be a good match for the project(s). Also, please indicate whether you are looking for IAP or spring or both IAP and spring, and whether you are seeking a UROP for credit or for pay.


11/21/17

IAP/Spring

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Comparative Media Studies (21 CMS)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Justin Reich

Project Title: Eliciting Learner Knowledge

Project Description: What if playing a game could help you become a better teacher or tutor? Eliciting Learner Knowledge is an online game designed to do just that - to help educators become better teachers by practicing how to interact with students in a role playing game about science topics. As part of the ELK team, you’ll work together to create games to learn what students know about topics such as energy, genetics, and chemical reactions. You will improve the current version of the game, and you will help us imagine and create new games to help improve teaching.. Sponsored research funding available.

Specific end of UROP goal: Design and create game bundles on different STEM topics for ELK, design new versions of games to help teachers become more effective in building on what students know.

Address letter to: Dan Roy danroy@mit.edu

Contact: Please send a resume and a brief cover letter via email to csambata@mit.edu.  Please indicate which project(s) you would be interested in and describe how your experience or interests would be a good match for the project(s). Also, please indicate whether you are looking for IAP or spring or both IAP and spring, and whether you are seeking a UROP for credit or for pay.


11/21/17

IAP/Spring

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Comparative Media Studies (21 CMS)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Justin Reich

Project Title: Crazy STEM-tastic Lessons Design

Project Description: Are you passionate about STEM? Do you want to share your ideas with K12 students and teachers? What are some crazy topics that you have been pursuing or interested that you think middle and high school students can learn from? This is an opportunity to have an independent design research project where you can pick a topic and create lessons/ activities and units, from robotics to mathematical modeling to nuclear physics to materials science. Starting from your ideas, we’ll work with teachers and designers to create lessons and activities that can be used in classrooms.

Specific end of UROP goal: Create and present a series of interactive, engaging activities, and experiences about STEM topics that are suitable for an audience of middle school or high school students. 

Address the letter to: Yoon Jeon (YJ) Kim

Contact: Please send a resume and a brief cover letter via email to csambata@mit.edu.  Please indicate which project(s) you would be interested in and describe how your experience or interests would be a good match for the project(s). Also, please indicate whether you are looking for IAP or spring or both IAP and spring, and whether you are seeking a UROP for credit or for pay.


11/21/17

IAP/Spring

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Comparative Media Studies (21 CMS)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Justin Reich

Project Title: Playful Practice Spaces and Making

Project Description: Do you like to play lots of different games? We are looking for UROPs who are interested in creating digital and non-digital games that can help teachers to be better prepared for authentic teaching situations. If you play a lot of games and are fluent with different game mechanics, you are the perfect candidate! For example, classroom management can be very challenging. What kinds of game mechanics can be used to teach this skill differently? If this question excites you, please join our lab to create these game prototypes. The prototypes you create will be used by the students of the Woodrow Wilson Academy of Teaching and Learning, and some other teacher education programs. You will have rich opportunities to design and test with other people who work in the lab as well.

Specific end of UROP goal: You will create a prototype of playful practice space (i.e. game-like learning experience) targeting teachers and help them to learn fundamental skills.

Address the letter to: Yoon Jeon (YJ) Kim

Contact: Please send a resume and a brief cover letter via email to csambata@mit.edu.  Please indicate which project(s) you would be interested in and describe how your experience or interests would be a good match for the project(s). Also, please indicate whether you are looking for IAP or spring or both IAP and spring, and whether you are seeking a UROP for credit or for pay.


11/21/17

Period: IAP - Spring 2018 - Summer 2018

Department/Lab/Center: Biological Engineering (Course 20)

Faculty Supervisor: Ron Weiss

Project Title: 2018 International Genetically Engineered Machines Competition

Project Description: We're looking for applicants to join the 2018 MIT iGEM team. iGEM is a collegiate synthetic biology competition: you will join a team of MIT students in designing and building synthetic gene networks to solve real-world problems, then present your results at the iGEM International Jamboree next fall.  Past MIT projects have involved topics ranging from biomaterials to DNA computing, Alzheimer's disease to biofuels and endometriosis.

The primary commitment is the summer of 2018, though there are (optional but highly recommended!) components over IAP and Spring 2018.

URL: http://igem.mit.edu

Prerequisites: Enthusiasm for programming cells with DNA!  We'll teach you all the skills you need.

Contact: Brian Teague (teague@mit.edu)


11/20/17

IAP/Spring

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Biology (Course 7)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Omer Yilmaz

Project Title: CRISPR editing organoids to study stem cell specific metabolic programs

Project Description: In the past decade, there has been a resurgence of interest in metabolism across a wide range of biological disciplines including immunology, neuroscience, stem cell, and cancer research.  This renewed interest is largely driven by a growing appreciation that specific metabolic programs underlie cell type specific and stimulus dependent behaviors in a wide range of cells and biological processes.  Thus, understanding the metabolic repertoire of a particular cell type is essential in understanding its specific capabilities.

In the Yilmaz lab, we are interested in understanding the metabolism of intestinal stem cells, both in their normal homeostatic state within intestinal crypts as well as during carcinogenesis.  Intestinal crypts have long fascinated biologists with their remarkable proliferative capacity, giving rise to the rapidly renewing intestinal epithelium.  Recently, the intestinal stem cells which harbor this remarkable capacity to create a new intestinal epithelium on a weekly basis have been spatially and genetically defined.  Interestingly, the metabolic pathways utilized by these rapidly dividing intestinal stem cells appear to be quite different from their neighboring support cells (Paneth cells).

We are utilizing CRISPR/cas9 mediated editing of intestinal stem cells to delete metabolic pathways of interest and assess how this impacts stem cell function, both in the context of normal intestinal homeostasis, and in the context of cancer.  We are actively seeking UROPs to work on this project, which will involve learning cutting edge techniques including:

  • ex vivo culture of intestinal organoids (“mini-guts”)
  • Designing and cloning plasmids for CRISPR/cas9 editing
  • Creation and propagation of CRISPR edited organoids
  • RNAseq profiling of organoids both grown in culture and after transplantation into mice

Prerequisites: No specific pre-requisites other than being highly motivated and interested in working in a lab for multiple years, with the intention of transitioning towards a largely independent project.

Contact: Jonathan Braverman: jbrave@mit.edu


11/17/17

IAP/Spring 2018

Department/Lab/Center: MIT Lincoln Laboratory

Faculty Supervisor:  Dr. Joseph Campbell

Project Title: Teaching Machine Learning Systems to Learn

Project Description: The Human Language Technology Group is engaged in a wide range of projects focusing on speech, text, image, multimedia, and language processing. The group’s speech and language processing research and development (R&D) efforts include automatic speech recognition, speaker recognition, language and dialect identification, keyword search, topic analysis, speech and audio signal enhancement, and machine translation. The HLT Group’s newest R&D efforts include domain adaptation for HLTs; cross-language information retrieval systems; cyber and transaction analysis; entity and relationship extraction; cross-media recognition; recommender systems; language-learning technologies; and analysis of social networks based on information content extraction from speech, text, and video combined with network communications and activities. In each of the group’s R&D areas, emphasis is placed on realistic data and experimental evaluation of techniques. On a global scale, the HLT Group leads research in several speech, text, and multimedia analytics domains, with a long-standing and extensive publication record and history of international honors for staff. 

Help dramatically expand the applications of machine learning by automating the process of constructing machine learning solutions. It currently takes machine learning experts weeks or months to solve new problems. Automating this process will decrease the time required by these experts to create solutions and may make it possible for biologists, physicians, urban planners, and others without a machine learning background to interact with an automated system and obtain high-quality solutions. Training such an automated system requires many datasets with machine learning solutions to a wide variety of problems. These solutions must begin with tabular, text, graph, rating, image, video, audio, geospatial, multimedia, and other types of data and end with an answer to a posed question. In this initial phase of this work, we are looking for students to help gather unprocessed datasets from the internet that include raw data and a problem of interest. They must curate the data and construct solutions to develop a community-wide resource that can be used to train automated machine learning systems. Each student will be challenged with a wide range of problem types and machine learning applications that require solutions. Our goal is for each student to solve twelve or more machine learning problems this semester with the help of advisors and other students. In the second phase of this project, we will continue to curate datasets, but also develop an automated learning system using the datasets already generated. 

This project is an opportunity to work with leaders in the field from MIT Lincoln Laboratory in the Human Language Technology and other groups. All work will be performed by students on their own laptops and cloud computing resources will also be available. Meetings with MIT Lincoln Laboratory staff will be held regularly on campus at the Beaver Works Center in Tech Square. Students must be able to devote 10 hours/week to the project.

Prerequisites: Must know how to use python and scikit-learn to create machine learning solutions for data-driven problems. Useful to have taken 6.036 (Introduction to Machine Learning) or its equivalent.  Helpful to be familiar with Pandas, ipython, and Jupyter Notebook.

Relevant URLs : http://ll.mit.edu/HLT

Contact: Charlie Dagli: dagli@ll.mit.edu

Apply: Please submit your resume and unofficial transcript to our website at https://ll.mit.edu/careers/research-opportunities.html.    In the ‘Search by Keyword’ field, please enter 19963.

A free shuttle bus is provided so that student may commute to Lincoln Laboratory from campus.  Please see https://ll.mit.edu/about/shuttle.html.


11/17/17

IAP/Spring

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Sloan School of Management (Course 15)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Jacquelyn Gillette

Project Title: Calculating spelling errors, grammar errors, and boiler-plate language in 10-Ks and 10-Qs.

Project Description: Understanding the causes and consequences of financial restatements is one of the most important questions in accounting and finance. For example, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 was implemented in response to the large accounting restatements such as Enron and WorldCom.

However, not all accounting restatements signify instances where managers fraudulently misreport financial statements, yet the theoretical framework and empirical measures for understanding the drivers of unintentional mistakes are not well identified in the literature. In other words, not all firms can afford to pay for the best accounting staff, and this leads to restatements because of unintentional mistakes rather than intentional fraud. We contribute to this literature by positing that firms optimally choose how much to invest in accounting resources (including hardware, software and accounting staff human capital) and the resulting earnings quality of the firm is the outcome of this optimal investment in accounting resources.

Using three novel measures for accounting resources, spelling errors, grammar errors, and boiler-plate language in the 10-K, we expect to find evidence consistent with our model’s predictions. Namely, we expect our measure of accounting resources to be negatively correlated with the likelihood of a future restatement.

This UROP provides students with the opportunity to participate in a research project that examines the determinants of accounting restatements from a theoretical and empirical perspective. Specifically, this research paper will examine how managers’ internal decisions affect financial reporting outcomes that are relevant to investors and regulators. Overall, this project will help students learn more about accounting restatements and the nature of financial statements (i.e., 10-Ks and 10-Qs). This project requires use of natural language programming such as Python to clean 10-Ks from XBRL formatting and then to calculate spelling errors, grammar errors, and boiler-plate language (i.e., language that is the same from year to year). The project will enable students to learn more about the information content of financial statements and about the research process.

Prerequisites: Preference will be given to students with extensive experience with natural language processing. Experience with XBRL is encouraged but not required. Please indicate in your email the program that you intend to use and your previous experience. The option to begin the UROP immediately and continue into the spring is available.

Contact: Jacquelyn Gillette: jgillett@mit.edu


11/17/17

IAP/Spring

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Brain and Cognitive Sciences (Course 9)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Ann M Graybiel

Project Title: Create fully-automated behavioral assays in mice

Project Description: Tap your creativity to develop fully-automated behavioral setups, using your electronics/engineering background! I am looking for undergraduate researcher(s) to design and fabricate system, and program controllers to assess mice behavior with minimal disturbances. Due to the stress imposed on mice by scientists who handle them and the environment unfamiliar to them, conventional behavioral assays have a limited ability to study the mode of decision making; try something new in seek of information (“exploration”) or do the best thing known to be rewarded (“exploitation”)? Because mood — manic and fearless? Or depressive and conservative? — would affect the mode, it is necessary to house and test mice in a familiar, stress-reduced environment, i.e. home cage.  Thus, how about equipping home cages with your state-of-the-art modules?

In the Graybiel lab, we have studied basal ganglia, a group of nuclei (composed of neurons) located deep within the cerebral hemispheres of the brain. Striatum, a biggest nucleus in the basal ganglia, is composed of two compartments; striosomes and matrix. Striosomes are interconnected clusters of neurons embedded in the surrounding matrix, forming 3-dimentional labyrinth. What we believe is that all the repertoire of automatic behaviors, whether they are innate or learned, is stored in striosomes, and matrix selects the appropriate and inhibits the inappropriate behaviors according to goals. Imbalance might be linked to “loss of agency” as involuntary movements in neurodegenerative disorders, or as involuntary thoughts in psychiatric diseases as schizophrenia.

Very recently, I have succeeded in selective targeting of developmentally old, and new striosomal neurons in mice. Based on their distinct axonal projection patterns, I hypothesize that the old and new striosomes are differentially involved in exploitation/exploration strategies animals take. New discoveries are within reach!

Prerequisites: Candidates with electronic background/work experience interested in creating own system for mice behavioral assays, independently or in a team. Candidates of all experience levels will be considered. However, preference is given to candidates with:

  • Great curiosity and enthusiasm!
  • Experience with MATLAB and/or C++ and/or python and/or LabView or equivalent
  • Experienced electronics background/work experience.
  • Experienced programming of electronic controller (e.g. Arduino, adafruit or equivalent)
  • Fabrication experience: 3D printing, Analog and digital circuits, Prototyping electronics

Ideally, I would like to find a UROP who would potentially be interested in pursuing the project for longer than a year. You can work on a flexible time schedule.

Contact: Ayano Matsushima: ayanom@mit.edu


11/17/17

IAP/Spring

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Brain and Cognitive Sciences (Course 9)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Ann M Graybiel

Project Title: Delineation of developmentally hardwired logics in the brain

Project Description: Logics may be determined by evolution. Rats quickly learn to avoid foods that share a characteristic “taste” of a food, which made them ill after eating. Contrary, birds quickly learn to avoid foods that share a characteristic “color” of a food, which made them ill after eating. Causal inference totally differs between the two species. We, humans, may also think and act in an evolutionarily restricted way. Then, what is the biological basis of these traits? Hardwired neuronal circuits would be the one, which is determined by developmental programs in large extent.

In the Graybiel lab, we have studied basal ganglia, a group of nuclei (composed of neurons) located deep within the cerebral hemispheres of the brain. Striatum, a biggest nucleus in the basal ganglia, is composed of two compartments; striosomes and matrix. Striosomes are interconnected clusters of neurons embedded in the surrounding matrix, forming 3-dimentional labyrinth. Very recently, I have succeeded in selective targeting of developmentally old, and new striosomal neurons in mice. I’m now accumulating evidence that the developmentally distinct striosomal subpopulations project to different region/sectors of other brain areas. Among the projection targets, what is of extreme interest is the control-centers for learning guided by positive and negative outcomes. Everyday is full of new discoveries! How about being the first person in the world to see the truth?

In this project, you will participate in histological analysis of mice brains, and may also be involved in viral injections. You will be fully supervised and can work on a flexible time schedule. With increasing experience and knowledge, I will help you to find your own project to pursue.

Prerequisites: Candidates of all experience levels will be considered. However, preference is given to candidates with:

  • Great curiosity and enthusiasm!
  • Love to do delicate works

Ideally, I would like to find a UROP who would potentially be interested in pursuing the project for longer than a year.

Contact: Ayano Matsushima: ayanom@mit.edu


11/17/17

IAP/Spring

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (Course 6)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Brian Anthony

Project Title: Pilot Product Development for Integrated Photonics Packaging Factory

Project Description: We have recently set up an integrated photonics packaging factory, and now we are at a stage to develop some pilot products. With this project, you will

  • work with multiple industry partners and MIT research groups to develop pilot products.
  • we have enough funding for us to tryout new ideas and prototypes.
  • a sample product can be a light-sensing device, it may include a laser chip and light detector.
  • we will scale up the product once the prototype has been made and tested.
  • process variation in finished products will be studied.

Prerequisites: All students are welcome! Any related experience to the following topics is a plus:

  • Optics and photonics
  • Integrated circuit and integrated photonics
  • Laser
  • PCB design, circuits
  • IC/IP packaging
  • Semiconductor
  • Electrical and optical testing
  • Process control

Contact: Mingxiu Sun: mingxiu@mit.edu


11/15/17

IAP/Spring

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Mechanical Engineering (Course 2)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: A. John Hart

Project Title: Direct-write self-assembly of functional colloidal materials

Project Description: We are developing an additive manufacturing technique that is capable of assembling micro- and nanoparticles into macroscopic three-dimensional objects. We are searching for enthusiastic undergraduates to help us branch this work out towards nanophotonics. In particular, we are interested in assembling functional particles such as quantum dots and nanocomposite particles into three-dimensional structures for novel concept devices.

The UROP experience will include nanomaterial fabrication, data analysis, graphics for publications, and academic writing. Exceptional work over two or more semesters can result in co-authorship of a journal publication. The UROP will work with a graduate student with extensive mentoring experience, whose students have won international accolades in venues such as the Google Science Fair.

Prerequisites: The project is open to all relevant engineering majors. The time commitment is 40 hours a week during IAP, and 10 hours a week in the Spring. Good candidates will be offered the opportunity to continue in the Summer. Please email Alvin Tan to schedule an interview.

Relevant URL: http://mechanosynthesis.mit.edu/

Contact: Alvin Tan (Course 3 Ph.D. Student): alvintan@mit.edu


11/15/17

IAP/Spring

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Media Laboratory

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Ethan Zuckerman

Project Title: Gobo Web/Algorithm Developer

Project Description: Gobo is a social media aggregator with filters you control. You can use Gobo to control what’s edited out of your feed, or configure it to include news and points of view from outside your usual orbit. Gobo aims to be completely transparent, showing you why each post was included in your feed and inviting you to explore what was filtered out by your current filter settings.  Learn more and try it out on https://gobo.social.  We need you to help us build out the interface, add more algorithmic filtering, and make it better.  This is great change to work on a real project that is changing how people think and use social media.

To use Gobo, you link your Twitter and Facebook accounts to Gobo and choose a set of news publications that most closely resembles the news you follow online. Gobo retrieves recent posts from these social networks and lets you decide which ones you want to see. Want more posts from women? Adjust aslider to set the gender balance of your feed… or just click on the “mute all men” button and listen to the folks who often get shouted down in online dialogs. Want to broaden the perspectives in your feed? Move the politics slider from “my perspective” to “lots of perspectives” and Gobo introduces news stories from sources you might not otherwise find.

Gobo retrieves posts from people you follow on Twitter and Facebook and analyzes them using simple machine learning-based filters. You can set those filters – seriousness, rudeness, virality, gender and brands – to eliminate some posts from your feed. The “politics” slider works differently, “filtering in”, instead of “filtering out” – if you set the slider towards “lots of perspectives”, our “news echo” algorithm will start adding in posts from media outlets that you likely don’t read every day.

Prerequisites:

  • An interest in social media and algorithms
  • Experience with any of the base technologies - React, Redux, SCSS, Python, Flask
  • Familiarity with APIs and OAuth

Relevant URL: https://gobo.social

Contact: Rahul Bhargava: rahulb@media.mit.edu


11/14/17

IAP/Spring

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Biology (Course 7)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Joey Davis

Project Title: Accelerating proteomics data analysis using highly parallel GPU-based processing

Project Description: High resolution mass analysis of proteins and peptides reveals complex spectra that must be accurately fit to determine the relative abundance of analytes. This fitting process is computationally intensive, but is readily amenable to parallelization using modern graphic processing units (GPUs). In this project, we will implement a least-squares Fourier transform convolution algorithm in CUDA and apply this algorithm to the analysis of a variety of mass spectra generated in our laboratory. The project includes the following aspects:

  1. Implementation of a fitting algorithm on GPU hardware
  2. Use of a top-of-the-line mass spectrometer to generate reference mass spectra for analysis
  3. Application of this fitting algorithm to the quantitation of spectra generated above
  4. Analysis of the benefits of GPU-based processing over traditional CPU-based implementations.

This UROP is offered in the Biology department, however highly motivated applicants from departments such as Electrical Engineering & Computer Science, Mathematics, and Biological Engineering are encouraged to apply. While this UROP is primarily computational, students interested in learning more about mass spectrometry will have significant opportunities to work in the wet laboratory. This UROP project will be directly supervised by Prof. Joey Davis.

This project is expected to require IAP/Spring terms for completion, however the UROP can be expanded to include additional projects in the coming years.

Prerequisites: Candidates of all experience levels will be considered. However, preference is given to candidates with experience with CUDA and/or python who can commit to working at least 20 hours per week during IAP and summer and 9 hours per week during the academic year. I am offering academic credit for new UROPs.

Relevant URL: www.jhdavislab.org

Contact: Joey Davis: jhdavis@mit.edu


11/14/17

IAP/Spring

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Mechanical Engineering (Course 2)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Klavs Jensen

Project Title: Collaborative Chemical Synthesis Robot

Project Description: We are developing a new configurable chemical synthesizing robot utilizing microfluidics. Its two unique capabilities are decentralized reaction modules for chemical synthesis/monitoring and a fluidic manifold for robotic manipulation. This work is being carried out by a cross-disciplinary team (chemistry, mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, chemical engineering) focused on overcoming limitations of chemical synthesis through IoT reactor modules which have integrated control electronics and process analysis technology to collect data and optimize reactions.

UROPs will be involved with the design and testing of new parts, electronic circuits, and sub-modules. They can also be involved with the development of new microfludic manufacturing techniques. We are also working on the development of a new web interface to communicate with IoT devices and path planning for the UR robot.

Prerequisites: The major requirements are motivation and an eye the detail. Knowledge of (or interest in) programming an Arduino/PSoC, experience with LabVIEW/Matlab/Python for UI development, mechanical component design experience would also be helpful (solidworks, 3dp).

Relevant URL: http://web.mit.edu/jensenlab/

Contact: Dale Thomas: dt3@mit.edu


11/9/17

IAP/Spring

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Biological Engineering (Course 20)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Doug Lauffenburger

Project Title: Improving monoclonal antibody therapeutics for cancer using computational modeling

Project Description: The immune function of the monoclonal antibody therapeutics is affected by an important post-translational modification called glycosylation. In this project, we will be investigating the regulation of this complex phenomenon in mammalian cells and their effect on the immune cell-mediated cancer therapeutics. The project includes one or more of the following aspects: 

  1. Computational approaches to integrate gene expression and metabolomics data to gain insights and come up with strategies to control glycosylation of antibodies 
  2. dynamic modeling of receptor signaling to investigate the effect of glycosylation on immune cell recruitment and therapeutics. 
  3. follow-up experiments to test the effect of glycosylated therapeutic mAbs on recruitment of immune cells to kill tumor cells. 

While this is a UROP offering in the biological engineering department, highly motivated and talented applicants from other departments such as Electrical Engineering, Computer Science, biology, and chemical engineering are encouraged to apply. Although this starts as a computational project, depending on the duration of the UROP training and the UROP’s interests, the project might expand and develop an experimental component toward the immunotherapeutic applications.

Prerequisites: Candidates (1) with computational background/experience interested in molecular cell biology or (2) with background in molecular cell biology interested in learning computational techniques are encouraged to apply. Candidates of all experience levels will be considered. However, preference is given to candidates with:

  • Great enthusiasm for research!
  • Experience with MATLAB and/or R and/or python
  • Knowledge/background in immunology
  • Strong theoretical background and experience in computational techniques like network inference, statistics, machine learning, bioinformatics, and other unique computational backgrounds

Please don’t be discouraged by the listed preferences. Enthusiastic UROPs will receive continuous supervision and training. We will give preference to candidates who can commit to working at least 20 hours per week during IAP and summer and 10 hours per week during the academic year. We are offering academic credit for new UROPs.

Due to the complexity of the system under study, it is required that UROPs commit to a minimum of two semesters to allow training and accomplishment of an interesting and meaningful project.

Relevant URL: http://web.mit.edu/dallab/

Contact: Sepideh Dolatshahi, Ph.D.: sepideh@mit.edu


11/6/17

IAP/Spring/Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Brain and Cognitive Sciences (Course 9)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Steven Flavell

Project Title: Developing code to control and analyze neuronal activity in a simple nervous system

Project Description: We examine how the brain generates persistent behavioral states like sleep/wake and emotional states. In mammals, the circuits controlling these states include millions of neurons, making them challenging to study. Using the nematode C. elegans, which has only 302 neurons, we have identified neural circuits that generate long-lasting locomotor states that animals display as they forage for food. We are developing tools for monitoring the activity of all of the neurons in these circuits simultaneously in moving animals, with the goal of understanding how activity within these circuits drives long-lasting behavioral states. We also hope that these studies will provide a platform for a mechanistic analysis of how persistent neural activity arises in neural circuits.

Current projects are centered around the imaging technologies and data analysis pipelines that facilitate this project. Current challenges that need to be addressed include: (Project 1) Improve on an existing computer vision software to automatically track multiple fluorescent cells across a movie, (Project 2) Develop hardware/software interface to optogenetically control the activity of neurons in real time in a free-moving animal.

Prerequisites: Students should have a fairly strong background in computer programming. Familiarity with C and/or MATLAB is preferable, and knowledge of Python or LABVIEW a plus. Students with coursework/experience in machine vision (for Project 1) and/or hardware control (for Project 2) are particularly encouraged to apply. Preference will be given to applicants who can commit ~10 hours per week. For sophomores and juniors, this position could be open to a longer-term commitment.

Contact: Steven Flavell: flavell@mit.edu


11/3/17

Spring

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Sloan School of Management (Course 15)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: M. Pilar Opazo

Project Title: The role of  'play' in creativity and organizations

Project Description: This project explores the role of 'play' in the organization of work. Empirically, the project focuses on creative industries, specifically, on the field of haute cuisine and the work of elite chefs. Some questions that this project aims to address are: What are playful practices involved in the professionals’ work? How is knowledge integrated in their everyday work? What is the role of play in the development of the professional’s careers and in the advancement of knowledge within organizations? What are the effect that these practices have in the organization of their restaurants and in their creations? How do these playful practices challenge, change or extend established norms and institutionalized ways of doing things in their field? The project builds on a broad set of interviews with haute cuisine chefs collected in Spain and the US. It will also include data collected from secondary sources including: videos, pictures, websites and others (e.g., menus, books written by chefs, etc.).

Prerequisites: Applicants should have an interest on collecting and analyzing  qualitative data, as well as on conducting literature reviews.  Proficiency in Spanish is a plus.

Relevant URL: www.mpilaropazo.com

Contact: M. Pilar Opazo: mpopazo@mit.edu


11/3/17

IAP/Spring

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Mechanical Engineering (Course 2)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Xuanhe Zhao

Project Title: Anti Fouling of Reverse Osmotic Membrane

Project Description: Surface fouling is one of the leading causes of inefficiency in marine vehicles such as ships, reverse osmosis processes and failure of biomedical devices. The economic cost of cleaning and repainting of the ship hulls alone is over billions of dollars. In reverse osmosis processes, fouling of the membrane is one of the largest contributors to downtime and energy waste. Typical foulants include colloids, bacteria, and salt deposits and current practices focus largely on surface or coating properties such as hydrophobicity and roughness. In nature, however, the skin and other external surfaces of plants and animals employ the strategy of using a layer of renewable sacrificial material or other mechanical deformation to prevent fouling.

In this project, we explore the use of mechanical vibration to solve the issue of biofouling on reverse osmotic membranes and other surfaces. We will address the theory of deadhesion of the foulant layer and verify that through experiments. There will be two parallel tracks: 1) Using polymer such as alginate hydrogel and PDMS as a model foulant to understand the deadhesion of foulant and subsequently develop a theoretical model 2) cultivating bacteria cells to generate biofilm on a surface to study the effect of quorum sensing. The eventual outcome of the project is to propose an in situ removal of foulant from the reverse osmotic membranes, which have great bearings on advancing the goal of having a sustainable and efficient water supply.

The UROP will be performing some of the experiments to verify the optimal conditions to remove the foulants from the surface and will also be assisting with the development of the theoretical model. This opportunity is a great way to gain experience in working with polymer and bacteria while also working on mechanical and electronic (piezoelectric) component of the experimental setup. Academically, the UROP will be required to study basic materials on structural and solid mechanics in order to assist in the development of the theoretical model.

Prerequisites: 

  • Basic knowledge in structure and solid mechanics.
  • Interest in experimental work. 
  • Any knowledge in polymer science and/or quorum sensing is a big plus.

Contact: Grace Goon: graceg@mit.edu


11/2/17

IAP/Spring

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Economics (Course 14)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Daron Acemoglu

Project Title: The Causes and Consequences of Technological Change in U.S. Agriculture: Immigration, Patenting, and Trade Protection

Project Description: We are looking for a UROP to work with us on a series of projects that tackle questions related to the pace and reaction of technological change, and use U.S. agriculture as an ideal setting to investigate these questions empirically.

First, by using variation in way that immigration changed the composition of agricultural labor markets, we are studying the impact of labor shocks and labor scarcity on subsequent innovation. This has particular relevance to policy debates today both on the implications of restricting immigration and ways that labor shortages, particularly in agriculture, seem to be followed with the development of new labor-replacing technologies.

Second, by using changes to U.S. patent law that are unique to agriculture and the development of new crop varieties, we are analyzing how the ability to take out a patent impacts the scale and direction of innovation, research spending, and market structure.

Finally, by exploiting changes in relative agricultural productivity over time, we are studying the way that productivity (or lack there of) across sectors within an industry impacts the lobbying of politicians and trade policy.

As a UROP, you would have the opportunity to work on all of the above strands of this project, and to focus on the parts that you find most exciting. Specific tasks would likely include compiling data from historical records, existing databases, and scientific research; statistical analysis of employment, agriculture, and innovation data; and summarizing historical and economic literature.

Prerequisites: An interest or coursework in economics, economic history, and/or innovation would make the experience more rewarding. Experience working with excel required. Familiarity with Stata, GIS, or other statistical languages, or a willingness to learn these languages preferred.

Contact: Jacob Moscona: moscona@mit.edu, Samuel Young: sgyoung@mit.edu


11/1/17

Fall/IAP/Spring

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Sloan School of Management (Course 15)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Duncan Simester

Project Title: Big Data - Economics

Project Description: We look for an undergraduates in Engineering/Computer Science/Economics interested in participating in an exciting academic research project using big data, online prices, web-scraping, large datasets, and applied economics.

Candidate will interact with faculty at the Sloan School (Economics) and a PhD candidate in Economics. This is a great combination as will provide exposure, and learning experience, to both perspectives. It will also give insights on graduate school and type of projects one might do during a PhD or Masters.

Prerequisites:

  • Experience with R, Python, Stata is a PLUS but not required. We DO NOT need experts in these programming languages, but candidates should have some familiarity.If you have doubts please email me.
  • Previous experience working with large datasets or web-scraping is a PLUS.
  • Available to start in November 2017.

Contact: Diego Aparicio: dapa@mit.edu


11/1/17

Fall/IAP/Spring

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Media Laboratory

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Pattie Maes

Project Title: Olfactory Interfaces + Biometric Data

Project Overview: We will be creating the second version of an aesthetic and fashionable wearable device (necklace, clip or jewelry) that can be remotely controlled through a smartphone and can vary the intensity and frequency of the released scent based on biometric or contextual data. This project is currently developed in collaboration with IFF (International Flavors and Fragrances) and has the potential to be manufactured in large quantities.

We are looking for 3 UROPs that want to contribute with the project in the following roles:

Project #1: Mechanical Engineering/Product Design 

Description: Contribute with the casing/3D model and design of the wearable device. You will be working with different materials for 3D printing as well as sizes and shapes. You will be able to create and iterate designs that reflect the project and inject beauty and life into it. We already have a 3D modeling case, so we will start our work based on that one, and make different versions. We might try other form factors such as including the scent inside a VR/AR headset or into clothing. You should be willing to push creativity, challenge established thinking.

Prerequisites: Experience using Rhino/Solid works.

______________

Project #2: Electrical Engineering/Product Design 

Description: Transfer the current circuit of the Essence necklace to a PCB (work already in progress). We’ll reduce the size and we’ll play around with flexible PCB and different design circuits to make it more efficient. We’ll send it to manufacture in large quantities. You should be willing to quickly learn Eagle/Altium (candidates that have some previous experience with PCB design will be prioritized).

Prerequisites: EE background. Experience using Eagle/Altium is a plus.

______________

Project #3: Android Development/Signal Processing: 

Description: You will be working on making the current Android app more robust. We are currently using in terms of connection with the sensors as well as the signal processing part. You will be working on the Android app to detect sleep stages using a combination of accelerometer, EEG and HR. Additional information: This project has been developed for long time, so we are planning to design and develop the final version with flexible electronics, and flexible materials (that's why we need you :)). Hopefully you will be working in an interdisciplinary team of electronic engineers, designers and software developers.

Prerequisites: CS background, experience programming in Java.

Relevant URL: www.judithamores.com/essence

Contact: Judith Amores: amores@mit.edu


10/30/17

Fall/IAP

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Media Laboratory

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Joi Ito

Project Title: Community Biotechnology Initiative

Project Description: Humanity's capacity to engineer the living world is a collective concern that requires collective engagement. While synthetic biology has expanded the breadth of technical participation to include a host of engineering disciplines, the next generation of innovators in biotechnology will include diverse communities across cultural, socioeconomic, artistic, and creative domains.

Led by Dr. David Sun Kong, the Community Biotechnology Initiative is developing tools and technologies to enable the broadest possible participation in biotechnology. Through this Initiative we aim to empower communities through biotechnology by developing open-source bio-hardware, virtual infrastructure for sharing, and also organizing impactful community programming.

We seek two UROP students to join our team for the Fall and/or IAP. 

Projects include:

  • Research on robust, low-cost solutions versions of cutting edge bio-technologies (e.g., building a $100 molecular biology lab)
  • Design and fabrication of new micro- and milli-fluidic technologies for biotechnology;
  • The continued development of ‘Metafluidics,’ an open repository of bio-hardware;
  • Work on ‘Biota Beats,’ a ‘microbial record player’ that translates micro-organisms of the body to sound;
  • Organizing the Global Community Biology Summit, a gathering of community and independent bio labs around the world at the MIT Media Lab.

 

Prerequisites:

  • a desire to utilize biotechnology as a means to create a more just, equitable society;
  • curiosity, enthusiasm, and a passion for learning;

Experience & Skills (preferred but optional):

  • Experienced electronics background/work experience. Applicants should be well versed with making analog/digital circuits, electronic controllers
  • Arduino and adafruit) and mechanical fabrication.
  • Prototyping electronics
  • Analog and digital circuits
  • Mechanical fabrication
  • basic wet lab experience, including molecular and micro-biology techniques;
  • microfluidic design and fabrication;
  • proficiency with wordpress and/or other web development platforms and tools;
  • community organizing experience

Relevant URL: https://www.media.mit.edu/groups/community-bio/overview/

Contact: David Kong: dkong@mit.edu


10/24/17

Fall/IAP

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Mechanical Engineering (Course 2)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Douglas Hart

Project Title: Please supply the project title for this UROP Synthesizing Activated Aluminum Fuel

Project Description: Alternative Energy is becoming a hot topic in the world as global warming is becoming more and more of a problem. Aluminum Fuel has great potential for making a cheaper way of producing hydrogen gas than traditional methods. The amazing thing about using hydrogen as an alternative energy source is that hydrogen combustion produces water as a harmless waste product. Normally aluminum forms an oxide layer that prevents it from reacting with water, but when suitably treated, it will readily react with water to produce hydrogen gas, which can be used to fuel an engine. The goal of this project would be to treat the aluminum fuel so that the Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine Team working in Beaver Works would have the appropriate amount of fuel for testing of their device, as well improving/upscaling the process. The team is working on creating an energy-dense power system that can power an unmanned underwater vehicle for up to ten hours.

Prerequisites: Please provide details on any prerequisites or skills required for this UROP. No previous lab work required, but must be motivated to do chemistry work in a lab.

Relevant URL: https://beaverworks.ll.mit.edu/CMS/bw/auvpowersubsystem2014capstone

Contact: Carter Morgan: morgancy@mit.edu


10/24/17

IAP 2018

Department/Lab/Center:  MIT Lincoln Laboratory

Faculty Supervisor:  Dr. Janet Hallet

Project Title:  IR Software Upgrades

Project Description: The Systems and Analysis Group (Division 10, Group 109) provides technical analyses to senior US Air Force leadership on a broad range of issues, pertaining to the survivability and capabilities of Air Force systems.  Many of these technical analyses rely on a large body of theoretical modeling and simulation tools for radio frequency (RF), infrared, GPS, and directed-energy systems.  These analyses are validated via laboratory experimental measurements and flight testing in conjunction with the Tactical Defense Systems Group (Division 10, Group 108).  In other cases, new models, supported by measurements and tests when feasible, are developed to evaluate new US Air Force capabilities.  Where a rapid capability is sought, the group may lead multi-group coalitions within the laboratory in the execution of these efforts. US Air Force and Department of Defense issues, for which the group provides analyses, include survivability of advanced US Air Force aircraft versus modern air defenses; the impact of current and future electronic attack and electronic protection techniques; the effectiveness of advanced weapon systems; the capabilities and limitations of intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance systems; and the vulnerability of precision-guided munitions to threat counters.  Technical areas of analysis include radar, infrared sensors, electronic warfare and GPS.    

Group 109 seeks a candidate who will work with more senior members of the group to optimize and expand the capabilities of group software related to the detection and tracking of aircraft in infrared imagery.  The student will be responsible for developing new architectures for data flow, incorporating new software features, and testing the code with imagery collected by airborne infrared sensors operated by Group 108.  The student will learn image processing, Kalman filtering, and tracking techniques.  It is desired that the student would begin work during IAP (January 2018), with the intent on returning during Summer 2018.  Options for working during the school year can be discussed.       

Requirements: Sophomore or Junior in Computer Science, Mathematics, Electrical Engineering, or other technical field.  Demonstrated ability to program in MATLAB.  Ability to work independently. 

MIT Lincoln Laboratory is an Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment and will not be discriminated against on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, age, veteran status, disability status, or genetic information; U.S. citizenship is required.

Apply: Please submit your resume and unofficial transcript to our website at https://ll.mit.edu/careers/research-opportunities.html.    In the ‘Search by Keyword’ field, please enter 19487. A free shuttle bus is provided so that student may commute to Lincoln Laboratory from campus.  Please see https://ll.mit.edu/about/shuttle.html.


10/20/17

Fall/IAP

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Science, Technology, and Society (STS)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Louis Bucciarelli

Project Title: The value of intercollegiate design competition

Project Description: The first intercollegiate Formula SAE design competition was held in 1981 at the University of Texas in Austin.  Six teams registered; forty students participated.  In 2017, the same event was held at Michigan International Speedway, Brooklyn, Michigan. 120 teams registered, 2299 students participated.  Once the only intercollegiate design competition on the books, now like events number on the order of a hundred.

This research seeks to characterize the nature of these different competitive design projects and evaluate the value to students  (and faculty) of participation.  How are they organized? Who gets to participate? What resources are required and where, how are they obtained. What motivates students to join in? Do they received academic credit for participation?

Results of this research will be mined in the writing of a paper on innovation in engineering education over the past three decades and the role (or not) of intercollegiate design competitions in the thinking of faculty responsible for the renovation of engineering degree requirements.

Prerequisites: An engineering student preferred but that is not essential. Interest in working with qualitative data and ability to synthesize and abstract out most significant features.

Funding: Sponsored Research pay is available.

Relevant URLs:

  1. https://peer.asee.org/student-competitions-the-benefits-and-challenges
  2. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baja_SAE

Contact: Louis Bucciarelli: llbjr@mit.edu


10/20/17

IAP/Spring

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Physics (Course 8)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Ian Crossfield

Project Title: Stars on FIRE: Know thy star, know thy planet

Project Description: We only know the properties of planets as well as we know their host stars. Small, cool, red dwarf stars are prime targets for the upcoming MIT-led TESS space telescope, but their masses, radii, and chemical compositions are particularly challenging to determine. TESS will spend its first year observing the southern hemisphere, and the southern red dwarfs are particularly poorly studied. Near-infrared spectroscopy offers one avenue forward, and has been used extensively to characterize exoplanet host stars. We have collected near-infrared data from the MIT-designed and built FIRE spectrograph for approximately two hundred of the nearest red dwarfs in the southern hemisphere. Interested students will work with Drs. Crossfield and Newton to take these spectra from their raw form to something that's useful for analysis using a pre-existing pipeline, with the possibility to extend the project to the analysis and determination of stellar properties.

Prerequisites: No prerequisites.  Project will involve computer work; Python familiarity is welcome but not required.

Contact: Ian Crossfield: iancross@mit.edu


10/19/17

IAP/Spring

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Lincoln Laboratory (LL)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Sumanth Kaushik

Project Title: Infrared Polarization, Astrophysical Dust, and Star-formation

Project Description: Polarized light is one of the few ways of remotely measuring magnetic fields and has implications for many fields of astrophysics including studies of the solar wind, star-formation, and the cosmic microwave background.  It is not well-understood how the polarized light traces magnetic fields, or in what types of physical environments the correspondence fails.  The current project will use new far-infrared data to study the dust-induced polarization in regions of active star-formation and compare it to other data sets tracing temperature, density, and interstellar chemistry.

Data sets that might be examined include (but are not limited to) polarization of starlight and emission from Galactic clouds, photometric imaging, and spectroscopic observations from several space- and ground-based observatories. Duties may include identifying relevant data sets, calibration of raw data, assisting in generation of computer models.

Compensation: The student will be working at Lincoln Laboratory with compensation commensurate with experience.

Prerequisites:

  • U.S. citizenship, per LL security requirements
  • Programming experience in C/python/matlab/IDL or equivalent
  • strong interest in Physics and/or Astronomy
  • Physics I and II (8.01x and 8.02x), or equivalent
  • past or concurrent intro. Astronomy course preferred (e.g., 8.28x)
  • student in 2nd-year undergrad. or beyond, preferred

Relevant URL: https://sofia.usra.edu/public/news-updates/first-images-demonstrate-capabilities-sofia%E2%80%99s-new-instrument

Contact: John Vaillancourt: john.vaillancourt@ll.mit.edu


 

10/12/17

Fall/IAP

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Sea Grant Program

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Prof. Michael Triantafyllou

Project Title: Fabricating and Testing MEMS Flow Sensors for Medical Applications

Project Description: A UROP position is currently available to assist scientists at the MIT Sea Grant program in the development and testing of novel MEMS flow sensors.  These sensors will find interesting and important applications in medicine (e.g. measurement of urine flow) and in other fields where accurate low-flow measurements are needed. This UROP is ideal for a student who wants experience in biomedical engineering.  Duties will include: designing and assembling a controlled flow experimental apparatus, assisting in the fabrication and mounting of the sensors, and testing their responses to different flow conditions.

Prerequisites: We are looking for a motivated and enthusiastic student interested in sensors and/or biomedical engineering.  A good knowledge of electronics and sensors, with experience building and testing electronic devices (2.678, 2.671 or equivalent) is required.  Knowledge of basic fluid mechanics and/or experience with the LabView programming language are also desirable.

Contact: Dr. Thomas R. Consi: consi@mit.edu


10/12/17

Fall/IAP

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Civil and Environmental Engineering (Course 1)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Moshe Ben-Akiva

Project Title: Automated mobility services

Project Description: Automated vehicles will change the face of our cities and open the path for new services. Automated taxis will be able to serve a high volume of passengers with efficient routes, no labor cost and high level of service. Automated buses will be able to change their route on-the-fly to accommodate new requests. Several households or entire neighborhoods will be able to share the ownership of same vehicles, allowing each traveler to “call” a car only when needed. We explore the deployment of a mobility service offered by deploying different kinds of vehicles (Uber-like taxis, buses, minibuses), targeting high level of service and low cost of operation. Under simplified settings, we evaluate through simulation the performance achieved by different deployment strategies. The candidate will i) be involved in extending a pre-existent simulation platform with the functions and the entities needed for the study, ii) set up a simulation campaign and analyze the results , iii) proactively propose strategies and algorithms. The work will be performed with the MIT Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) Lab, a multidisciplinary research group investigating the impact of information science in future transportation systems.

Prerequisites: 

  • Programming skills are required, preferably in C++.
  • Experience in discrete event simulation is a plus.

Relevant URL: https://its.mit.edu/about-its-lab

Contact: Andrea Araldo: araldo@mit.edu


10/12/17

Fall/IAP

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Civil and Environmental Engineering (Course 1)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Moshe Ben-Akiva

Project Title: Ride-sharing mobility services

Project Description: One of the most distinctive traits of this decade is the sharing economy: apartments are shared on Airbnb, office space is shared in the co-working spaces and cars are shared among the passengers of ride-sharing services, like Uber. Why has the sharing economy gained momentum right now and not before? One of the main reasons is the pervasiveness of devices able to compute and communicate, e.g., smartphones, electronic systems in cars, etc. This pervasiveness allows to offer the shared good in virtual showcases and to compute an allocation of the good among the different requesters. On the other hand, the same pervasiveness allows a huge number of goods and requesters to join the service , thus rendering the computation of the optimal allocation infeasible. It has been show that computing the optimal matching between passengers and cars in a ride-sharing service is an NP-hard problem. Heuristics have been developed and evaluated empirically. 

Our aim is to go one step further and find heuristics that i) give a theoretical guaranteed bounded gap with the optimal solution and ii) are inherently easily distributable. The candidate will be involved in i) coding these heuristics in a discrete event simulator, ii) evaluate the performance, iii) proactively propose algorithms and strategies. The work will be performed with the MIT Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) Lab, a multidisciplinary research group investigating the impact of information science in future transportation systems.

Prerequisites

  • Programming skills are required, preferably in C++.
  • Experience in discrete event simulation is a plus.
  • Experience in development of parallel systems is a plus.

Relevant URL: https://its.mit.edu/about-its-lab

Contact: Andrea Araldo: araldo@mit.edu


10/12/17

Fall

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Materials Science and Engineering (Course 3)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Michael Cima

Project Title: Understanding chemotherapy challenges in India

Project Description: This UROP is part of a project to develop a new device for local chemotherapy delivery into the abdomen to treat metastasized cancer (ovarian, GI etc.). This chemotherapy is specifically known as intraperitoneal chemotherapy. The project is funded by the MIT Tata Center to apply this new technology to cancer care in India. The graduate student who would be supervising the UROP is a Tata Fellow looking to understand (i) the current treatment options in India for these metastasized cancers and their shortcomings, (ii) the challenges of intraperitoneal chemotherapy in India, and (iii) the requirements for the device that are relevant to the Indian setting. 

The UROP will specifically focus on:

  1. Collecting information on cancer treatment, challenges, unmet needs and willingness to adopt new solutions in India through surveys - tasks include crafting and distributing surveys, collecting and analyzing the data
  2. Working with the graduate student supervisor to translate these data into actionable findings for the design of the proposed device

Relevant URL: https://tatacenter.mit.edu/portfolio/implants-for-cost-effective-and-accessible-intraperitoneal-delivery-of-chemotherapy/

Contact: Aikaterini Mantzavinou: amantzav@mit.edu


10/11/17

IAP 2018

Department/Lab/Center: DMSE / Libraries

Faculty Supervisor: Rafael Jaramillo / Micah Altman

Project Title: Methods for Open and Reproducible Materials Science

Project Description: Help us develop the future of open materials science. We will explore new ways of improving the development, publication, discovery, and use of experimental data in materials science. We are looking for students who are curious about the intersection of data management, libraries, publishing, and machine learning; and who are inquisitive, reliable, and energetic.

 

As a research assistant in the Jaramillo Group and the Libraries Program on Information Science, you will meet regularly with the faculty advisors on conducting research advancing open and reproducible materials science.  This will include: identifying and evaluating methods and tools for reproducible science -- especially those focused on data and workflow management and sharing;  interviewing selected members of DMSE to characterize their data management and sharing workflow; and developing prototype methods for sharing data in open discovery and repository systems. Opportunities for further research are available upon completion.

Building infrastructure for open materials science is as much a social challenge as it is a technical one. We are looking for students who enjoy learning about others through conversation and observation. The ideal candidate should be enthusiastic about making new personal connections and interviewing busy researchers. 

Prerequisites:

  • Experience in lab-based materials science
  • Basic competency in python or R. 
  • Minimum commitment is 6 hours per week

URL:

Contact: Rafael Jaramillo: rjaramil@mit.edu.  If interested list of completed courses, resume (optional) / summary of programming skills, and a short description of why you would be a good candidate.


10/10/17

Fall/IAP

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Sloan School of Management (Course 15)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Zen Chu

Project Title: Quantifying innovation impact through temporal and geographical trends in healthcare using data analytics

Project Description: MIT Hacking Medicine has run healthcare entrepreneurship events around the world over the past 6 years. The group has amassed data from over 150 events including healthcare hackathons and design thinking workshops. Collectively, this repository of data could reflect the state of healthcare in a specific region at a specific point in time.

We are looking for an undergraduate researcher to develop methods to analyze this data in the context of macro healthcare and entrepreneurship trends. This will be a valuable experience for data analysts interested in working together with senior healthcare professionals and learning more about the complex healthcare space.

An ideal student would be familiar with data analysis techniques data mining, natural language processing (NLP) methods, phrase mining and topic modeling  techniques to apply them to this data set and ascertain trends associations.

Prerequisites: Basic proficiency in data analysis and data mining, natural language processing (NLP) methods, phrase mining or topic modeling techniques is preferred. We will give preference to candidates who can commit to working at least 12 hours per week during the academic year. We are offering academic credit for new UROPs. The position is available starting immediately.

Contact: Khalil Ramadi: kramadi@mit.edu


10/10/17

Fall

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Media Laboratory

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Sandy Pentland

Project Title: Data Science: Visualizing Urban Segregation

Project Description: In this project, we will analyze data from the online social media platform, Twitter, in order to visualize and understand patterns of social segregation of major urban areas in the US. We aim to build an interactive visualization tool, for people to explore different cities, layouts, and segregation of people’s behavior. We expect this project to provide insight about the dynamics of segregation for scientists, policy makers and urban planners. It will be a web-accessible tool, consisting of a frontend application developed in JavaScript, a backend application developed in Python and MySQL, and a scientific module for building human mobility and interaction models.

Prerequisites: Experience in developing data visualization tools in d3.js and some knowledge of Python programming

Contact: Alfredo Moralesl: alfredom@mit.edu


10/10/17

Fall/IAP

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Materials Science and Engineering (Course 3)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Elsa Olivetti

Project Title: Industrial waste characterization for use in sustainable building materials

Project Description: With growing concern over the environmental impact of industrial activity, research efforts have increasingly become focused on finding beneficial uses for industrial waste products. One promising emerging field has been alkali activation and geopolymerization of waste materials with high silica and alumina content. As waste materials have inherent variability, this UROP will focus on experimental characterization of different wastes both pre- and post-chemical processing. Characterization techniques will include X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence, and others. Wastes will include agricultural residue ash (i.e. rice husk and sugarcane bagasse ash), metal slag, and aluminum dross. The ultimate goal of this research is to establish the utility of industrial wastes in producing alkali activated building materials.

Prerequisites: Prior experience with X-ray characterization techniques would be useful. Applicants with other characterization experience are also encouraged to apply. Any prior knowledge about building materials, Portland cement, geopolymers, alkali activated materials, and alkali aluminosilicate glasses will be considered a plus.

Relevant URL: http://olivetti.mit.edu/research-project-3/

Contact: Hugo Uvegi: huvegi@mit.edu


10/10/17

Fall/IAP/Spring

Department/Lab/Center: Media Lab

Faculty Supervisor: Alex `Sandy' Pentland

Project Title:  Rhythm Badge: an Open-Source wearable for quantifying face-to-face interaction

Project Description: We are developing a platform for quantifying, analyzing and improving team collaboration outside the lab in real-life situations. One of its components is the Rhythm Badge - a wearable devices for quantifying face-to-face communication.

We are looking for a talented individual who can continue developing the firmware and hardware of the badge. This may include adding an accelerometer (code + hardware), optimizing the layout of the badge for manufacturing, improving proximity and localization using signal strength, adding encryption and other means of security to the badges, and more. 

For those of you who are interested in design for manufacturing, this project provides a unique opportunity to experience a full design iteration. After changing the circuit design you will work with a U.S based PCB+A manufacturer in order to create a small prototype batch, test it, and later create a batch of 100 units that will be used in our studies.

Skills you need to already have: Significant embedded programming experience (e.g. Embedded C, Arduino) or significant programming experience and strong interest in learning embedded programming.

Optional skills: Familiarity with Nordic nRF51/52 series (a major plus). Experience designing circuit boards.

Other prerequisites: we are looking for students who are able to contribute a minimum of 12 hours per week during the semester.

Contact: Oren Lederman (orenled@media.mit.edu) with a short description of your background or resume.


10/4/17

Fall

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Architecture (Course 4)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Les Norford

Project Title: Development of enhanced user interface for building architectural simulation/design tool

Project Description: CoolVent is an architectural simulation tool developed at MIT, with a user-friendly interface whose source code is based in C#. The program’s functionality was recently expanded to include additional calculations related to pollution transport and wind pressure phenomena; however, these calculations were inputted directly to the Java-based source code, and the user-interface has not yet been expanded to include them. This UROP seeks a student with experience in Java and C# programming to enhance the user-interface to include these functions. The research team is receptive to converting the UI source code to an alternative language if the UROP student provides justification for doing so. There is potential for additional expansion of the UI to include greater flexibility in building geometry inputs, interior environmental conditions, etc.

The following links demonstrate the existing CoolVent interface and source code:

Prerequisites:  Interest in developing elegant, user-friendly interfaces. Experience in C# and Java programming. Some knowledge of computation of linear algebra systems and matrix manipulation preferred. It is not necessary to have prior knowledge in building architectural design or fluid mechanics.

Contact: Justin Lueker: jlueker@mit.edu


10/4/17

Fall/IAP

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Management (Course 15)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Prof. Christian Catalini

Project Title: Using Machine Learning and Big Data to Predict Startup Success

Project Description: The objective of this project is to develop new code and tools to predict startup growth. 

Please only apply if you have very strong programming skills in python. Machine learning is a plus. Some libraries we use in our work include sklearn, tensorflow, and Keras. Knowledge of SQL and basic statistics are a plus.

Students will have access to a unique, large-scale dataset of startup founding and growth events. They will also learn about the economics of early-stage entrepreneurship and startup fundraising (equity crowdfunding, angel financing, venture capital).

If you are interested in getting hands-on experience in machine learning, economics research and data analysis as well as to understand the dynamics of startup success, this would be a great learning opportunity. 

Contact: Please emailChristian Catalini (catalini@mit.edu) with your resume/CV. Also, please include your availability to meet and past experience with machine learning projects.


10/4/17

Multiple Openings

Fall/IAP

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Management (Course 15)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Prof. Christian Catalini

Project Title: Using Machine Learning and Big Data to Predict Cryptocurrency Growth

Project #1: Web Developer + Data Analysis

Project Description: Build web apps to help us collect data online! And build the infrastructure for us to build models to infer the accuracy of online workers. There are lots of opportunities to shift to different roles within the project and try out different types of tasks from validating machine learning models to setting up data pipelines.

Required Skills: Strong coding skills and fast learner; Familiar with statistics/probability; Python 3, HTML/CSS/Javascript; Vue, React, or Angular; Unix, Nginx

_________

Project #2: Modeling Scientist

Project Description: Do you love building models which can scale up to terabytes of data? If so, you might be a good fit for our project. Our team studies the economics of crytocurrencies, using state-of-the-art machine learning to produce insights on the blockchain. We are looking for talented research scientists to help us solve challenging problems from annotating the bitcoin graph with geographical location to detecting fraudulent initial coin offerings.

Required Skills: Python 3; git, unix, scipy, beautifulsoup; Tensorflow/Keras or PyTorch; some familiarity with graphical models; Strong machine learning + NLP background.

Students will have access to a unique, large-scale dataset on cryptocurrencies and tokens. They will also learn about the economics of early-stage entrepreneurship and startup fundraising (equity crowdfunding, token sales, angel financing, venture capital).

If you are interested in getting hands-on experience in machine learning, economics research and data analysis as well as to understand the dynamics of cryptocurrency success, this would be a great learning opportunity. 

Contact: Please email Christian Catalini (catalini@mit.edu) with your resume/CV. Also, please include your availability to meet and past experience with web development for position 1 and with machine learning projects for position 2.


10/4/17

Fall/IAP

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Sloan School of Management (Course 15)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Andrew W. Lo

Project Title: Survey to Help Address the Challenges of Alzheimer's R&D

Project Description: We aim to collect robust data regarding willingness-to-pay (WTP) for Alzheimer’s therapeutics. Such data is required to be able to conduct the kinds of economic calculations needed to compel more urgent action, and may also be useful for incorporating patient perspectives into clinical trial design. This will entail the development of a survey that aims to gauge the WTP for Alzheimer’s therapeutics among Alzheimer’s patients and their family members or caregivers.

Responsibilities: Research assistant(s) will help design, pilot, and revise the survey, and may also help with protocol design and data collection.

Prerequisites: Basic understanding of survey design and assessment; Strong reading and writing skills; Familiarity with Alzheimer's disease symptoms and burden of care a plus.

Contact: If interested, please send statement of interest, resume, and unofficial grade transcript to Jayna Cummings, jcummin@mit.edu


10/4/17

Fall

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Media Laboratory

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Chris Schmandt

Project Title: LeARn

Project Description: AR Application with physical robot for emotional adaptive learning in space. The UROP role will involve replicating the AR experiment Invisible Highway (https://experiments.withgoogle.com/ar/invisible-highway) based on controlling physical things in the real world by drawing in AR. Invisible Highway is a Google AR Experiment that allows the user to make a pathway along the floor on the phone and the robot car will follow that path on the actual floor in the room. A custom highway with scenery is generated along the path to make the robots a little more scenic on your phone screen.

Prerequisites:

  • Hardware knowledge (Adafruit, Arduino, BLE comms)
  • Software (AR, Unity C#)
  • Design skills a plus

Relevant URL: https://experiments.withgoogle.com/ar/invisible-highway

Contact: Anna Fuste: afuste@media.mit.edu


10/4/17

Fall

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Economics (Course 14)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Jon Gruber

Project Title: MIT Research to Public Policy Mapping

Project Description: The mission of the International Policy Lab (IPL) is to enhance the impact of MIT research on public policy. The IPL works with faculty from across the Institute to better connect their research to the decision makers who are able to act on it. As policy making becomes increasingly technical it will be vitally important that the knowledge created in Universities is properly applied to the policy making process.

In an effort to further develop such connections the IPL is beginning an initiative to map all research conducted at MIT to corresponding policy domains. This project has three main goals. 1) To make MIT researchers more aware of the policy implications of their work, 2) to identify high impact opportunities for researchers to engage with policy makers, and 3) to facilitate the development of evidence based policy both domestically and internationally.

Prerequisites: Ideal candidates will come from any School at MIT and will be comfortable drilling down to understand the technical details of multiple research programs. An interest in the application of research to the development of public policy is preferred but no policy experience is required. Training will be provided by MIT’s Washington DC office. Ideally the student will begin this project during IAP and continue through Spring semester but it is possible to begin this project in the Spring semester.  

Relevant URL: http://policylab.mit.edu

Contact: Please send your resume and any questions you have to Dan Pomeroy, dpomeroy@mit.edu.


10/4/17

Fall

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Urban Studies and Planning (Course 11)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Chris Zegras

Project Title: Standardizing socioeconomic data for accessibility analysis

Project Description: The Mobility Futures Collaborative has developed CoAXs, a web interface for analyzing accessibility, the ease with which residents can reach destinations like schools and jobs in urban areas. CoAXs relies on two main inputs: GTFS files of the transit network and shapefiles of socioeconomic data. The former is very standardized, the second not at all. The aim of this project is to facilitate the conversion of socioeconomic data to a format usable in CoAXs and similar tools.

Milestones:

  • Build database of socioeconomic data + GTFS for cities where CoAXs applies
  • Propose standards for socioeconomic data formats
  • Identify patterns in the modifications necessary to make data usable in CoAXs
  • Evaluate strategies to automate such modifications

Prerequisites - There are no strict prerequisites, but the following are desired:

  • Interest in urban transportation and/or city planning
  • Familiarity with SQL, JavaScript, R or Python
  • Willingness to contact local and foreign government agencies to procure data

Relevant URL: http://coaxs.mit.edu/

Contact: Jonathan Leape: jleape@mit.edu


10/4/17

Fall

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Urban Studies and Planning (Course 11)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Chris Zegras

Project Title: Balancing resilience and accessibility

Project Description: The Mobility Futures Collaborative has developed CoAXs, a web interface for analyzing accessibility, the ease with which residents can reach destinations like schools and jobs in urban areas. In response to terrorist attacks, natural disasters and the looming threat of climate change, many cities are planning for resilience. This project aims to identify the conditions that create tension between accessibility and resilience goals, and seek ways to balance the two.

Milestones:

  • Conduct literature review of techniques for modeling vulnerabilities and building resilience in transportation networks and urban development
  • Build catalog of urban resilience plans
  • Create Conveyal Analysis scenarios of resilience plans (GTFS + SE data) for select cities
  • Compare accessibility indicators with and without resilience plan
  • Identify conditions that lead to synergy between resilience and accessibility, and those that lead to tension

Prerequisites: 

  • Experience manipulating shapefiles (preferably QGIS)
  • Interest in city planning and/or transportation

Relevant URL: http://coaxs.mit.edu/

Contact: Jonathan Leape: jleape@mit.edu


10/4/17

Fall/IAP

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Economics (Course 14)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Simon Jäger

Project Title: Labor Market Inequality: Understanding the Role of Human Capital and Firms

Project Description: Professor Simon Jäger is seeking a UROP student to help with two projects aimed at understanding the role of firms and human capital in shaping labor market inequality. The projects use large-scale administrative data to answer questions such as: how easily can firms replace workers? Which skills make workers harder to replace? What factors shape an employee’s decision to leave a firm? The UROP student will be working with faculty member Simon Jäger and a research assistant in the Department of Economics.

Prerequisites: The UROP student will prepare and clean data for analysis, conduct analyses, and visually present the results. This will be a unique chance to learn how to combine quasi-experimental and experimental methods with large-scale administrative data in order to get causal estimates that address questions of core interest in labor economics. Depending on the workflow and the UROP student’s interests, the student will also have the opportunity to be involved in other tasks, such as literature queries and the design of surveys.

Contact: Simon Jäger: sjaeger@mit.edu


10/4/17

Fall/IAP

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Chemical Engineering (Course 10)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Patrick Doyle

Project Title: Dynamics of knots in granular chains

Project Description: We are interested in the behavior of knots in polymer chains, and study this by performing experiments with knotted DNA molecules. We are interested in studying similar phenomena at a larger scale, by replacing microscopic polymers with macroscopic chains (e.g. bead necklaces) and replacing random thermal motion with random mechanical agitation (e.g. a vibrating platform). UROP students will set up the experiments, record data, and write and implement image processing codes to analyze the data.

Prerequisites: Familiarity with MATLAB is a plus, as is experience tinkering with electronics.

Relevant URL: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wqyNblLjI60

Contact: Alex Klotz: aklotz@mit.edu


10/4/17

Fall

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Chemical Engineering (Course 10)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Pat Doyle, Yoel Fink

Project Title: Self-Gelation of Hydrogel Biomaterials

Project Description: We are looking for a UROP to develop a method to fabricate hydrogel microfibers with control of the cross-sectional shape. Hydrogel microfibers have been investigated in tissue engineering applications because hydrogels can form 3D scaffolds for cell growth and structures in the human body, such as blood vessels, neural pathways, and muscle fibers, have a thin, fibrous shape. The UROP will work with graduate students in Chemical Engineering and Material Science to fabricate microfluidic channels with specific cross-sections and use these channels to produce hydrogel fibers. After successfully developing a fabrication method, there are several opportunities that can be explored depending on the UROP’s interest.

Prerequisites: UROP should enjoy making things and bringing creative solutions to problems. Previous experience in microfluidics is preferred but certainly not required.

Relevant URL: https://doylegroup.mit.edu/

Contact: Rodger Yuan: rodger@mit.edu and Maxwell Benjamin Nagarajan mbn@mit.edu


10/4/17

Fall 2017

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Sloan School of Management (Course 15)

UROP Faculty Supervisor: Georgia Perakis

Project title:  Analytics-driven logistics for healthcare start up

Project Description: Our project is about delivering on-demand healthcare services at home. Our objective is to revolutionize how healthcare is delivered by providing “house-calls, on-demand, powered by analytics”. Patients will be matched with healthcare providers, and care will be provided when and where most convenient for the patient. 

We are collaborating with Incasa (healthcare startup) in order to design realistic models that will help them make operational decisions for at home healthcare delivery. This includes using machine learning and statistics techniques to estimate demand, devising policies to match customers with providers, and building simulations which will help them analyze the performance of their operations and suggest ways to improve.

Responsibilities: First of all, you will be a member of the research team and the whole team will meet weekly. In these meetings we will work on modelling the problem, devising algorithms, building theory, discussing results and setting further steps. Outside of research meetings, we will work with data, implement and test algorithms, and research literature. The most important responsibilities will be to process the data, code the algorithms and run the computational experiments, which are decided upon during meetings. 

Qualifications:

  • Competence with Python is required
  • Experience in machine learning and optimization is preferred
  • Experience with geospatial data and visualization tools (incliding interacing with Google maps) is not necessary, but is a plus.
  • Experience in R also a plus

Salary: $18 per hour 

Contact: Please send applications or questions to Professor Georgia Perakis (georgiap@mit.edu), Max Biggs PhD student (maxbiggs@mit.edu) Applications should include your resume and a concise statement of why you are interested and why you would make a good fit. If you are interested please apply as soon as possible.


10/4/17

Fall 2017

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Media Laboratory

UROP Faculty Supervisor: Pattie Maes

Project Title:  Metamorphosis

Project Overview: Our goal is to expand and enhance the process of creative storytelling in the field of new media art through real-time rendering of visuals that approach motion picture quality. This UROP position focuses on developing dynamic Shaders to use with the reconstruction of 3D models (Point Clouds) in the context of VR and projection mapping.

Personal Role & Responsibilities: The role as a Computer Graphics UROP requires previous experience with rendering pipelines or game engines (e.g. Unity) and  shaders, the ability to understand research papers and implement new algorithms in the fields of computer vision/graphics, and strong software development skills (C++ or C#).

Skills : GPU Programming (GLSL, HLSL), OpenGL, Shader implementation, realtime rendering, knowledge in 3D Engine (Unity/C# typically or Unreal/C++)

Contact: Sang-won Leigh sangwon@media.mit.edu and Guillermo Bernal gbernal@media.mit.edu