Advertised Project Openings


Below are currently advertised UROP projects available to eligible undergraduates. All projects, regardless of mode (pay, credit, or volunteer) are expected to be worth MIT academic credit and be supervised by MIT faculty. Projects appear on this list in the order they have been received.

These projects do not represent all available UROPs as many faculty do not submit project listings for this site. Rather, they expect interested students to contact them based on their general research to discuss potential UROPs.

Available UROPs

UROP Project listings are posted for approximately one month before they are removed, unless we are asked to re-post.

5/24/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Materials Processing Center (MPC)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Lionel Kimerling

Project Title: Integrated Photonics Industry Assessment

Project Description: Are you interested in the following part-time paid summer UROP?  This is a study for the American Institute for Manufacturing (AIM) Photonics, which runs AIM Photonics Academy at MIT. The goal of the AIM Photonics Academy is to train future engineers, scientists, technologists and technicians for high-paying jobs in the photonics industry. Here is more info on AIM Photonics Academy: https://aimphotonics.academy

The main task for the UROP role is to conduct interviews at various companies, and help analyze data that has been gathered. The interviews are geared towards gaining a better understanding of how one should train the future workforce for Photonics. When visiting companies (Small and Medium Enterprises).  The protocol is to have an hour-long interview with individuals in several different roles at each company (i.e., engineering lead, CEO/executive administrator, and/or HR manager).

This person will visit (along with the lead PI):

  1. Large-size companies to interview folks in different roles at each big company, all at the same visit; and
  2. separately visit SMEs to interview CEOs and also to serve as an outreach for introducing what AIM Photonics Academy can do for them (engage these SMEs). All the interview questions have already been set and approved.

Skill set required:

  • Qualitative research methods (or the interest to learn and apply it).
  • Familiarity or interest in integrated photonics would be helpful.
  • Passionate and hard-working.

Relevant URLs: https://aimphotonics.academy

Contact: Yashu Kauffman: yashu@mit.edu


5/24/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (Course 6)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Daniela Rus

Project Title: Developing an Indoor Positioning System at MIT using WiFi

Project Description: We aspire to deploy an indoor positioning system that can be used by students and visitors to navigate around buildings using their smartphones, or to find objects that have been tagged with WiFi emitters.  We have spent the past 2+ years developing the theory and now are ready to implement this in a live setting - so this is where it gets exciting!  To start, we will deploy in areas around the MIT Stata Center and/or the MIT Career Fair.  Our long-term goal with the project is to deploy this technology in hospitals to help doctors and nurses find patients, medical equipment, and other critical assets that will allow them to do their job more efficiently - providing needed care faster.

We are looking for UROPs to dive in on this project with us. UROPs with skills in programming, linux, embedded systems and/or mechanical and electrical engineering design are particularly welcome to apply.  Experience with laser cutting and/or 3D printing is a plus.

Relevant URLs: http://www.ubietytech.com/

Contact: Stephanie Gill: sgil@mit.edu


5/19/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research (WI)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Rudolf Jaenisch

Project Title: Combine Human Stem Cell and Gene Editing Technologies for Autism Drug Discovery

Project Description: Autism spectrum disorders severely affect the mental and physical development of millions of patients. Traditional method for autism drug discovery is inefficient. We have developed a human stem-cell based drug-screening platform to seek out for a cure of a genetically-defined type of autism termed Rett syndrome.  Our discoveries may provide novel therapeutic strategy to treat autism patients worldwide.

Join us to learn how to maintain cultures of human embryonic stem cell and neuronal derivatives, and to use molecular cloning and CRISPR/Cas9 gene targeting technologies to generate genetically-engineered human stem cells.

You will further be engaged in the use of high-throughput screening methods to identify new drug candidates from large compound libraries based on their effectiveness to rescue disease-related molecular and cellular phenotypes, and the follow up pharmacological and biochemical validation methods.

Prerequisites: We welcome motivated undergraduate students with education in the major of Biology or Chemistry. Prior laboratory research experience is recommended but not required - we will train you on the job.

Relevant URLs: https://reverserett.org/rsrt-awards-funding-in-the-pursuit-of-balance/

Contact: Xin Tang: xintang@wi.mit.edu


5/17/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Materials Science and Engineering (Course 3)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Polina Anikeeva

Project Title: Magnetothermal excitation of biological tissues

Project Description: The Bioelectronics Group in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering  is looking for a UROP with interest in material science and/or biological applications. The proposed research focuses on minimally-invasive, injectable platform to enable multi-organ neuromodulation without the need for implants. We use magnetic nanoparticles that when being exposed to alternating magnetic fields, dissipate heat that triggers thermally sensitive ion channels and evokes neuronal excitation. Several projects are available including nanoparticles synthesis, immunohistochemistry of tissues and microfabrication.

Prerequisites: Students with training in biological engineering, material science, or related fields are encouraged to apply. Experience with general laboratory practices is required Starting date: ASAP

Contact: Dekel Rosenfeld: dekelr@mit.edu


5/17/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Media Laboratory

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Hiroshi Ishii

Project Title: Paper Microfluidics

Project Description: In this project we investigate the flow of fluids in a microfluidic channel made of paper. In particular the channels will be optimized for delivering a particular oxidizing agent. A UROP taking up this position is expected to perform quantitative analysis of the channel for the delivery of the agent. Responsibilities will involve fabrication of paper microfluidic channels, performing quantitative chemical analysis and fine tuning the channel design.

Prerequisites: Chemistry (must have). Microfluidics (good to have). Hands-on fabrication (good to have).

Contact: Udayan Umapathi: udayan@mit.edu


5/17/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Plasma Science and Fusion Center (PSFC)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Jerry Hughes

Project Title: Educational Video Game

Project Description: For two decades, one of the favorite items in the PSFC’s collection of outreach equipment has been an arcade-style video game that simulates aspects of plasma confinement and control in a tokamak.  The game is a memorable activity for the students who play it, and helps them to engage more with the topics covered in the outreach curriculum.

Despite its success, the game is dated and is in need of a replacement or major renewal.  As such, we would like a UROP student to create a proposal for the updated version of the PSFC's outreach video game.  While the tokamak will remain the theme of the game, the UROP's design process is open-ended, and can produce an outcome that may be very similar to or depart substantially from the original.

PHASE ONE:

  • communicate with area teachers who have brought their students to the PSFC and graduate students who have used the game to explore the current version's strengths and weaknesses.
  • research games meant for science outreach that have been created by other organizations; look for helpful resources in designing games for outreach, both in terms of literature on the subject as well as software tools.
  • Create a report compiling what has been learned, and outlining a concept for a refreshed version of the game.

PHASE TWO:

  • Build a demonstration version of the game that captures the new conceptual design.  For this purpose, the UROP may use AppInventor or another framework that the UROP either already knows very well or can become familiarized with rapidly.  The demonstration version is not meant to be a final implementation of the game, but rather, together with the report, to be a guide for how the game may be fully implemented in the future.
  • Make recommendations for how the final version of the game can be implemented, researching options for putting out a contract for the work, or for doing the work in-house.

Prerequisites: Some familiarity in programming would be helpful, but is not required, as this is mostly a scoping project.  The UROP should be passionate about science education, and excited about the work we do at the PSFC.

Relevant URLs: http://www.psfc.mit.edu/outreach

Contact: Paul Rivenberg: rivenberg@psfc.mit.edu


5/17/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Media Laboratory

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Tod Machover

Project Title: Spaces That Perform Themselves

Project Description: Interested on working in the intersection of art, science, music, technology, architecture and perception? This project consist on the creation of a multi-sensory installation for augmenting the perception of sound and its relationship to space. The objective is to build a room that morphs with a musical piece and provides different perceptual stimuli to create a choreography of a space with sound, kinetic architecture, vibrations, color and light. All this to compose a new kind of aesthetic experience mixing experimental music, synesthesia, new instruments and installation art.

Building on the understanding of music and architecture as creators of spatial experience, this project aims to create a novel way of unfolding music’s spatial qualities in the physical world. The project will design a complete embodied experience that changes how we think about sound and its relationship to space. The project’s objective is to create a new type of architectural typology that morphs responsively with a musical piece. Presenting spatial and musical composition as one synchronous entity.

The goal of the project is to create a multi-sensory environment where music’s perpetually changing characteristics reconfigure the spatial organization of a space, thus creating “multiple rooms” along the way. The multiple rooms will be constructed by specific choreographies of sound, architecture, light and color. The physical space will be affected by a mechanical system that will move flexible fabric walls, so they can adopt different shapes and positions. The sound will be projected from an array of speakers and the light and color from LEDs that will be embedded on the structure. These will control sound position and intensity, along with light, color and brightness. This system will respond to the input of music, which will deploy a performance by a dynamic Space that is alive and in constant flux.

The project aims to give shape to a novel music-spatial aesthetic expression, where the piece is an experience of sound that is choreographed by a dynamic space and embodied in a person’s relationship to it. Along with opening the possibilities of a new experimental music composition model, the project will explore the virtues of architecture as a medium not for a purpose, but for an effect.

Prerequisites:

  • Experience with Arduino, processing, and C++.
  • Experience with Microsoft Kinect for gesture control, 
  • Experience with controlling multiple stepper motors, controlling LEDs.
  • Loves music, knows about or is interested on learning about interactive art, interested in sensors for gesture control (such as kinect).
  • Interested experimental music, synesthesia, new instruments and installation art.  

Contact: Sizi Chen: sizichen@media.mit.edu


5/15/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Economics (Course 14)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Daron Acemoglu

Project Title: Levelling the Playing Field: Contact, Incentives and Caste Prejudice

Project Description: 52% of upper castes in India continue to practice “untouchability” (discriminating against lower castes). These group relations persist despite castes living in close proximity (albeit in segregated villages). Integration may be a natural policy response, but little is known about how the type of cross-caste interaction might matter. This project is then a field experiment in India which tests whether competitive incentives weaken the effects of interaction.

Cricket tournaments (5 of 8 completed so far) are used to integrate men from all castes, with men randomly assigned to teams (giving variation in cross-caste exposure). The teams are then also randomly assigned to individual vs. team pay (competitive vs. collaborative incentives). After each tournament is over, we use a variety of games and activities to measure caste prejudice amongst participants and non-participants.

We are seeking UROPs to work with us, carrying out the following US-based tasks:

  • Project and data monitoring during and after each tournament
  • Regression analysis
  • Visualisation and analysis of caste social networks

Prerequisites: The ideal candidate will have a strong background in Economics or Political Science, experience using Stata and the ability to work independently.

Commitment: 6-12hrs/week, Summer term (with possibility for extension).

Contact: Matt Lowe: mlowe@mit.edu


5/15/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Economics (Course 14)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Daron Acemoglu

Project Title: The Political Contact Hypothesis: Can Integration Reduce Polarization?

Project Description: It is well known that political polarization has increased in the United States over the last several decades. Such polarization leads to legislative gridlock and an ideological divide amongst the electorate. In this project we aim to answer a simple question: if politicians were to come into more frequent contact with politicians across the party divide, would their views become more moderate?

To test the hypothesis, we will use natural experiments in Iceland, Norway and Sweden, where there exists random variation in who sits next to who in the legislative chamber.

We are seeking UROPs to work with us, carrying out the following tasks:

  • Language processing (using Python) of speech text
  • Contact w/ Iceland/Norway/Sweden Parliaments regarding exact institutional details
  • Python programming for web-scraping of politician biographies, vote records
  • Regression analysis

Prerequisites: The ideal candidate will have a strong background in Economics, Political Science and/or Computer Science, experience using Stata, web scraping/language processing with Python, and the ability to work independently. Norwegian/Swedish/Icelandic language skills would be an asset, but not required!

Commitment: 6-12hrs/week, Summer term (with possibility for extension).

Contact: Donghee Jo: djo@mit.edu


5/15/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Program in Writing and Humanistic Studies (Course 21W)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Suzanne Lane

Project Title: Web/UI Designer

Project Description: Writing, Rhetoric, and Professional Communication (WRAP) recently received funding from the Davis Family Foundation to develop a series of “reasoning diagrams,” which reveal the underlying logical relationship between central concepts in a discipline.  We have already created such a reasoning diagram for Materials Science and Engineering, are close to finishing one for Comparative Media Studies, and are currently working on ones for Computer Systems, for Brain and Cognitive Sciences, and for Chemical Engineering.  These reasoning diagrams are used as a teaching tool to help students learn the patterns of thought and explanation in a field, and thus we are also developing instructional materials to accompany them, both in the classroom and online.

Responsibility: You will work with the directors of WRAP, as well as a graduate research assistant, to design elements of the online instructional materials, including some interactive tools for working with the reasoning diagrams. Different tools, for instance, might incorporate gaming elements, or might allow students to zoom in on particular reasoning patterns and see many examples or adapt the diagram to their own research project. While we are looking for someone with fundamental coding skills, we are also looking for strong graphic design, storyboarding, and/or animation experience.

Commitment: Between 20-35 hours per week.  We are currently looking for someone for the summer, but interest in continuing with the project beyond this summer is desirable.

Prerequisites: 

  • Experience with python, java, HTML, and CSS.
  • Ability to work in a multidisciplinary team
  • Ability to meet deadlines and work independently

Familiarity with key design concepts and processes:

  • Design Research
  • Branding and Graphic Development
  • User Guides/Storyline
  • UI Prototyping
  • Interactivity and Animation
  • Adaptation to All Device Screen Sizes

Contact: Becky Shepardson: bshep@mit.edu


5/15/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Chemical Engineering (Course 10)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Michael Strano

Project Title: Isolated chloroplasts interfaced with nanobionics: a living synthetic material

Project Description: Plant chloroplasts are natural photocatalysts converting CO2 and light into glucose. This project aims to develop a novel synthetic material based on glucose produced by isolated chloroplasts. The main challenge achieving this goal is associated with the limited stability of the isolated chloroplasts. To circumvent this, we will augment chloroplast stability with nanobionics approach that was recently pioneered in our lab. A student will learn how to isolate chloroplasts from living plants, run viability tests, study their stability under various conditions, and develop nanotechnological routes to enhance chloroplast stability. This is a highly interdisciplinary topic combining plant science, material science, chemistry, and nanotechnology. A student will be free to choose the most appealing direction.

Contact: Volodymyr Koman: koman@mit.edu


5/15/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Chemical Engineering (Course 10)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Michael Strano

Project Title: Atomically-thin materials

Project Description: 2D materials (e.g., graphene) reach the ultimate limit of thickness of only few atoms. This brings new exciting properties that are distinct from the bulk. Furthermore, stacking 2D materials on top of each other allows for unprecedented control in material design. One example of these materials is molybdenum sulfide (MoS2). Unlike graphene, MoS2 monolayer possesses photoluminescence in the visible range, making it very attractive as a sensor. Since MoS2 fabrication remains difficult, its properties, especially chemical ones, are not well studied to date. In this project, a student will learn how to synthesize MoS2 using chemical vapor deposition, characterize it using spectroscopy techniques, and finally study MoS2 interaction with various chemical compounds. A student will also have the possibility to fabricate 2D nanocomposites to study mechanical and thermal properties of 2D materials. This is a highly interdisciplinary topic and a student will be free to choose the most appealing direction.

Prerequisites: Please provide details on any prerequisites or skills required for this UROP

Contact: Volodymyr Koman: koman@mit.edu


5/15/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Brain and Cognitive Sciences (Course 9)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Tomaso Poggio

Project Title: CBMM Engineering of Intelligence (EIT) Teams

Project Description: Depending on your background and interest, we will recommend one or two of the following projects.

  1. Language modeling, question answering and reasoning, machine translation, conversation modeling with Recurrent Neural Networks (RNNs) and other models
  2. Visual recognition, detection and segmentation using Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs)
  3. Visual question answering with RNNs + CNNs
  4. Computational modeling of visual cortex & biologically-plausible learning of neural networks
  5. Reinforcement learning with games and virtual environments
  6. Design new machine learning tasks and benchmarks
  7. Participate various machine learning challenges (e.g., ILSVRC, Microsoft COCO, WMT, etc.) We provide sufficient computational resource and technical support from dedicated research engineers.

Prerequisites: Interest in Machine Learning and/or AI. Previous research experience is NOT required.

Contact: Xavier Boix: xboix@mit.edu


5/15/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Political Science (Course 17)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: In Song Kim

Project Title: Processing Text to Reveal Lobbying Activity

Project Description: Our project investigates how money affects American politics through lobbying. To support this research, we intend to develop software for the efficient comparison of text related to legislation. The software will operate on a large corpus of legislative text to identify when language from one document appears in similar form in another document.

The research assistant will work with us to identify functional and non-functional requirements for the software, and then implement the planned solution. The RA will work approximately 10 hours per week in June, July, and August. Interested applicants should send a short statement of interest (1-2 paragraphs) indicating preferred start date, along with a resume/CV.

Prerequisites: The ideal candidate will have experience with text processing in Python, and in particular the efficient implementation of string distance algorithms.

Contact: James Dunham jdunham@mit.edu


5/15/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Sloan School of Management (Course 15)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Dr. Wanda Orlikowski



Project Title: Research on 9-1-1 Emergency Coordination

Project Description: Emergency management organizations play an important role in the functioning of a city. Specifically, these centers manage the coordinated dispatch of police, fire, and emergency medical services, among others. The emergency communication call-takers and dispatchers act as the “first” first responders to emergencies of various kinds. They do this through answering 9-1-1 calls and other requests for help, quickly gathering the required data from callers and other real-time information technologies, synthesizing the data to make sense of what is going on, categorizing the incidents and entering information into the Computer Aided Dispatch (CAD) system, and coordinating various activities during emergency response.

Despite the importance of dispatch and emergency communications centers, very few research studies have examined the coordination and decision-making challenges and complexities involved in this work. Moreover, the 9-1-1 emergency field is undergoing several changes due to shifts in the technological and institutional regime. With the profusion of mobile phones in the United States, the volume, type, and pattern of 9-1-1 calls have significantly increased (including a significant increase in the % of redundant calls, prank calls, missed dials, and non-emergency requests) which is impacting both the staffing and management of these emergency centers as well as increasing the percentage of time that police officers and EMTs spend in responding to 9-1-1 calls for service.

Therefore, the motivating question for this research is to understand how does one organize a 24x7 emergency center in the digital age, where the constant connectivity of mobile devices and social media are changing public expectations regarding response times and service levels? As a part of this research, we will be analyzing “big data” related to 9-1-1 call logs and Utilization data to understand the volume, type, and the flow of calls across multiple cities and years. We will also be building models to predict call-volume and call-patterns, which could in turn help the centers to organize accordingly and plan their staffing & patrol deployment.

If you are interested in (a) getting hands-on experience in collecting and analyzing high-volume data (e.g., city-level 9-1-1 calls, crime reports) (b) convert unstructured data into structured data and do analysis, (c) participate in interesting and relevant social science research, this would be a great learning opportunity. UROP will closely participate in research related to a number of questions related to the application of big data/analytics to the field of emergency response. Specifically, we have three types of UROP positions:

Position 1: Candidates with knowledge of intermediate statistics (e.g., regression analysis), and experience with statistical tools (such as STATA or R). Responsibility for this position include managing and analyzing data using statistical software. The ideal candidate is a highly motivated student with strong background in statistics/econometrics and with good data analysis skills.

Prerequisites for Position 1:

  • Intermediate Statistics (including STATA or R)
  • Experience with Microsoft Excel (Macros, VBA)
  • Good data analysis skills

________

Position 2: Candidates with strong programming skills in scripting languages (such as Python),  Responsibility for this position include writing code to collect data from a variety of sources, converting unstructured data to structured data,  data management, and a sincere interest in the phenomena of big data and analytics.

Prerequisites for Position 2:

  • Programming skills with scripting languages (Python or Ruby or Perl)
  • Experience with Microsoft Excel

________

Position 3: Candidates with good data management skills – someone who can cleanse and improve the quality of both quantitative and qualitative data. UROP type: Paid, For Credits, as well as Volunteer.

Contact: Please email Arvind Karunakaran: arvindk@mit.edu with a brief intro (or with a resume/CV). Also, please include which UROP position you are most interested in, your availability to meet and number of hours per week to work.


5/15/17

Summer 2017

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research

MIT Faculty Supervisor: Ram Sasisekharan

Project Title: Predicting physiological response using the latest in hardware and software technology.

Project Description:  We are developing a flexible technology platform that can be used to predict physiological response to varied experiences with specific applications to cancer care. We will assemble the end-to-end, hardware, software and analysis components necessary to conduct experiments to measure these physiological responses.

Successful candidates will have a unique opportunity to work with a multi-disciplinary team at the Koch Institute on a project with academic and commercial applications across life sciences and health care. 

Skills:  We are looking for 2-3 students this summer who are interested in contributing to the platform (for pay or academic credit) in one of the following capacities- exactly matching experience is preferred but not required:

1)  Signal Processing / Data Storage: 

  • Signal processing of physiological signals using Python or Matlab
  • Setting up backend DBs in AWS environment

2) Software Engineering with hardware/Bluetooth integration: 

  • Knowledge of Bluetooth communication systems
  • Medical Device / IOT / other hardware integration

3) Software engineering/development of immersive environments: 

  • Programming skills in C#
  • Android/iOS game development

Contact: Toby Clark: clarkt@mit.edu


5/8/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Urban Studies and Planning (Course 11)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Jinhua Zhao

Project Title: Global Attitudes towards the Future of Mobility: Survey Sample Weighting for Cross-Country Comparisons

Project Description: The JTL Urban Mobility Lab, along with other MIT esearchers in the MIT Energy Initiative Mobility of the Future consortium, collected a global survey of attitudes towards travel and new transportation technologies and services (i.e. electric vehicles and autonomous vehicles). The sample consists of N=1000 or N=500 responses for each of 52 countries across the world. The sample was controlled at the country-level for age and gender during data collection, but is not representative on some other sociodemographic dimensions. We are looking to hire a student to help collect the country-level income and other information necessary to determine new weights for the responses. The student should then calculate these new sample weights and apply them in generating comparisons of descriptive statistics and response distributions across countries.

Skills:

  1. Strong background in sampling statistics and survey evaluation
  2. Ability to research and collect income and other sociodemographic data at the country level from online, open source, international databases
  3. Ability to independently apply survey response weighting techniques, particularly Iterative Proportional Fitting (raking)

Relevant URLs: http://energy.mit.edu/research/mobility-future-study/

Contact: Joanna Moody: jcmoody@mit.edu


5/8/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (Course 6)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: James L Kirtley

Project Title: Design a Graphical Interface on Python for extracting frequency response of microgrid resources in real time

Project Description: The goal of the job is to design a Python GUI for extracting frequency response data from emulated microgrid resources and controllers such as solar inverters, natural gas generators, and wind turbines. The task will include an understanding of linear time invariant (LTI) systems, perturbation theory, and control and operation of microgrid components such as inverters and electric machines.

Contact: Edwin Fonkwe: efonkwe@mit.edu


5/8/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Sloan School of Management (Course 15)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Georgia Perakis

Project title:  Analytics-driven logistics for healthcare start up

Project Description: Our project is about delivering on-demand healthcare services at home. Our objective is to revolutionize how healthcare is delivered by providing “house-calls, on-demand, powered by analytics”. Patients will be matched with healthcare providers, and care will be provided when and where most convenient for the patient. 

We are collaborating with Incasa (healthcare startup) in order to design realistic models that will help them make operational decisions for at home healthcare delivery. This includes using machine learning and statistics techniques to estimate demand, devising policies to match customers with providers, and building simulations which will help them analyze the performance of their operations and suggest ways to improve.

Responsibilities: First of all, you will be a member of the research team and the whole team will meet weekly. In these meetings we will work on modelling the problem, devising algorithms, building theory, discussing results and setting further steps. Outside of research meetings, we will work with data, implement and test algorithms, and research literature. The most important responsibilities will be to process the data, code the algorithms and run the computational experiments, which are decided upon during meetings. 

Qualifications:

  • Competence with Python is required
  • Experience in machine learning and optimization is preferred
  • Experience with geospatial data and visualization tools (incliding interacing with Google maps) is not necessary, but is a plus.
  • Experience in R also a plus

Salary: $18 per hour 

Duration: summer, with the possibility of extending further

Contact: Please send applications or questions to Professor Georgia Perakis (georgiap@mit.edu), Max Biggs PhD student (maxbiggs@mit.edu).  Applications should include your resume and a concise statement of why you are interested and why you would make a good fit.  If you are interested please apply as soon as possible.


5/8/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Health Sciences and Technology (HST)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Dr. Timothy Padera

Project Title: Investigating the molecular determinants of lymph node metastasis

Project Description: Metastasis remains the principal cause of cancer mortality. Thus, the challenge is how to treat cancer cells that have spread to lymph nodes or distant organs in order to prevent their growth and ideally eradicate them from the body. A major goal of our lab is to dissect the molecular determinants of lymph node metastasis. Using multiple animal models of lymph node metastasis that are established in our lab, we will investigate the gene profiles of these tissues in order to determine what genes allow cancer cells to thrive in metastatic sites. Our data from RNA sequencing analysis show that cancer cells in the lymph node have a differentially regulated transcriptomic profile compared to tumor cells at the primary site.  Student(s) will be involved in the workflow of validating the importance of these targets and in the process, gain an understanding of several molecular biology techniques. A long-term commitment represents the opportunity for co-authorship on a manuscript, in addition to experience with intravital imaging, immunofluorescence microscopy, tumor biology immunology, cell culture and biochemical assays.

We are searching for dedicated and ambitious undergraduate researchers to assist with this project. The undergraduate researcher(s) will work closely with a postdoctoral fellow to execute the research plan.

Prerequisites: Prior research experience is preferred.  Applicants should be self-motivated, reliable, interested in the project and pay great attention to experimental details. The student should be available to work in the lab at least 40 hours per week through the summer and interested to continue the project through the Fall.

Contact: Ethel Pereira: epereira@steele.mgh.harvard.edu


5/8/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Mechanical Engineering (Course 2)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Prof. Allan Myerson

Project Title: "Pharmacy on Demand" Equipment design/build/test

Project Description: The overall aim for this project is to develop, design, build, test, and demonstrate   an innovative, miniaturized, self-contained, automated, continuous end-to-end pharmaceutical drug manufacturing unit. This research is part of the DARPA Pharmacy on Demand project.

Role: We are looking for one or more students to work with our engineering team to conduct various tasks, including:

  • Designing, fabricating, debugging, and working with custom components and automated systems.
  • Running equipment, following experimental procedures, gathering and compiling data.
  • Project documentation (creating and updating parts lists, procedures, instructions, etc.)
  • Developing control code (LabView)

Possible projects include:

  1. Testing and process development of an automated system to dispense, weigh, and transfer powders with a range of material properties. Work could include experimental testing, mechanical assembly, Labview programming (motion control, serial communication with devices, data acquisition, control logic, and user interface)
  2. Testing and process development of an automated powder dosing and tableting operation. Work could include experimental testing, mechanical assembly, wiring, and Labview programming (similar to above)
  3. Testing, and test development, of proposed tableting quality control techniques including NIR and tablet stability testing
  4. Testing and process development of an automated system to perform crystallization, purification and drying of active pharmaceutical ingredients.
  5. Development of the next generation of the systems described above.

Prerequisites: 

  • Motivated individual with strong aptitude for hands-on work in a lab-based setting.
  • Proficient in Microsoft Office suite.  
  • Attentive to details.

Desired qualifications:  Experience with prototyping, machine tools, and electro-mechanical systems is a plus, as is experience with data analysis, SolidWorks, and Labview.

Contact: David Brancazio: dbrancaz@mit.edu


5/8/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Urban Studies and Planning (Course 11)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Eric Klopfer

Project Title: Learning Design Projects for a New Teacher Education Program

Project Description: The Teaching Systems Lab is currently looking for a highly motivated individual who can help us re-imagine how STEM teachers are prepared for today’s schools.

Do you want to learn how to design blended learning experiences where you can use your creativity and playfulness to create graduate school-level curriculum?  The Teaching Systems Lab is looking for summer UROPS who will join our interdisciplinary team consisting of research scientists, designers, teachers, and teacher educators to prototype blended learning experiences that provide rich practice opportunities for STEM teachers.

The UROP will learn different learning design frameworks and be part of the team to create curriculum prototypes that are informed by learning sciences.

Responsibilities include:

  1. design engaging learning materials such as games and online modules
  2. research high quality teaching and learning
  3. conduct user testing and revise the materials according to the testing results
  4. document design process for future referral.

Relevant URLs: tsl.mit.edu

Contact: Sarah Jane Vaughan: svaughan@mit.edu


5/8/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Media Laboratory

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Ramesh Raskar

Project Title: Emerging Worlds

Project Description: We are looking for social science research: both a current assessment and recommendations. You should be able to tell us how we are doing and what we could do to improve.

In your application, please tell us how you would structure a research study during the summer of 2017. It should culminate in a report with recommendations that will enable us to stay on the cutting edge of best practice and to improve the Emerging Worlds program.

You should address at least one of these areas in your research, report and recommendations:

  • Innovation programs structure/models
  • Sourcing grand challenges
  • Networks of innovation hubs/clubs
  • Measuring social impact – formulas and tools
  • Ethics of engaging for social impact

Prerequisites: For this UROP we are seeking a student with an affinity for and demonstrated skills/experience in social science, innovation for social impact, and one or more of the above categories of research. Experience in an emerging economy is a plus.

Relevant URLs:  http://mitemergingworlds.comhttps://docs.google.com/document/d/10cGXI-rSAOgTETPfQtrvworHnO1c16MdvPbSL_6Gi8w/edit?usp=sharing

Contact: Beth Zonis: zonis@mit.edu


5/8/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Architecture (Course 4)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Christoph Reinhart

Project Title: Interactive Web Interface for Living MIT Campus Energy Model

Project Description: Around 40% of US carbon emissions can be attributed to buildings, an alarming statistic which has triggered the development of many energy savings technologies from coated window glazings to LED light bulbs and improved insulation materials. While the building design and construction industry is nowadays capable of delivering highly efficient new buildings, some of which are becoming Zero Net Energy Buildings (ZNEB), owners of existing buildings still face the challenge to decide which actions to take to reduce carbon emissions in a cost effective way. In order to help MIT and other campus operator to manage their building related carbon emissions, the MIT Sustainable Design Lab is collaborating with the MIT Office for Sustainability on a Living MIT Campus Energy Model. The model relies on a new set of simulation technologies that self-adjust over time to mimic measured building energy use. The model can be used to (a) track over time whether all buildings “behave as they should” (.i.e. nothing is broken), predict energy savings form a set of proposed retrofitting options, (c) validate after renovation whether predicted savings are being realized and (d) track MIT’s progress to reduce building related carbon emissions.

For this UROP position we are looking for students who can develop an interactive web based interface for users to access and process simulation results from the MIT campus model.

Required Skills: Strong programming skills with Javascript/JSON web development

Preferred Skills:

  • Experience with full stack development, server side applications
  • Basic understanding of Rhinoceros and Grasshopper modeling environment
  • Basic understanding of energy simulation engines, such as EnergyPlus.
  • Basic understanding of building energy concepts, construction materials

Contact: Shreshth Nagpal: shreshth@mit.edu


5/8/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Mechanical Engineering (Course 2)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Sanjay Sarma

Project Title: Technology and student learning at MIT

Project Description: The project takes place at the MIT Office of Digital Learning (ODL).  This project seeks to understand the ways students learn at MIT — in classrooms and outside. The UROP researcher will look into web resources (videos snippets, MIT institutional reports, journal papers, MIT News articles etc.), research institutional data (e.g., course evaluations), and collect anecdotal leads through informal discussions with MIT students, professors and staff members.

The UROP researcher will work closely with the ODL residential team throughout the project, will analyze the collected information from the learning-science perspective, and present a well organized dataset and brief summary report for MIT and the public.

This project offers opportunities to learn the process of qualitative data collection, analysis of quantitative and qualitative data, learning science principles, and content presentation.

Prerequisites: Experience of qualitative data gathering and research a plus, but not a must. Familiarity with presenting content on the web (making/running websites or blog), front-end and user experience design a plus. Hours flexible, but ideally looking for at least 20 hours/week.

Contact: Anindya Roy: anindyar@mit.edu


5/8/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Media Laboratory

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Ramesh Raskar

Project Title: Deep learning with distributed application

Project Description: We will emphasize on security related features in supervised and unsupervised learning. Candidates will develop pipelines using deep neural networks and state of the art methods in object classification/segmentation. We will use either tensorflow/caffe/theano for development and testing. This is a research project and desired final outcome is working libraries and paper. Funding available.

Prerequisites: Candidates should be proficient in Python/C++. Candidates should have ideally taken courses in Algorithms and data structure, Machine Learning experience is a plus.

Contact: Otkrist Gupta otkrist@mit.edu


5/8/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Urban Studies and Planning (Course 11)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Brent D. Ryan

Project Title: Examining the implementation of a “Smart Shrinkage” plan in an American shrinking city: Youngstown, Ohio

Project Description: Shrinking cities are cities that afflicted by economic downturns and subsequent population loss. It is not difficult to find a shrinking city in the US, especially in the Rustbelt. In the last decade, the concept of “smart shrinkage” has been proposed by some urban scholars as a panacea to tackle most problems in shrinking cities. It advocates an alternative planning paradigm that depart from the traditional growth-oriented one which has been heavily criticized. By believing in a smaller city that can also be more beautiful and accepting the reality of depopulation, “Smart Shrinkage” advocates rightsizing redundant physical space and public services, in order to accommodate them with the real population.  In 2005, City of Youngstown released the Youngstown 2010 Plan, as the first comprehensive plan in the US that claimed to adopt a “Smart Shrinkage” paradigm. This Plan received national acclaim and various awards. In 2013,  Youngstown released its updated zoning, Youngstown Redevelopment Code, as the most important subsequent planning effort to implement the Plan. The study, headed by Professor Brent Ryan and Visiting PhD student Shuqi Gao, will investigate the mismatch between the Plan and the Zoning, as well as the local response to these “Smart shrinkage” strategies. We have almost completed the first phase of this study, in which we have identified parcel-level differences between these two and concluded the major variations. Meanwhile we have conducted four trial interviews with local informants on inquiring the causes of these variations. We plan to conduct more interviews and a field trip survey there to have deeper understanding of the mismatch, as well as the local reactions of these “Smart Shrinkage” strategies. The UROP will be available during the Summer (20 hours per week) and Fall (10 hours per week) and will include GIS analysis of plan and map data, preparation of interview protocols, telephone interviews with informants, and, pending availability of funding, field interviews of informants. The UROP will be of interest to students with interests in GIS, urban policy, social justice, shrinking cities, economic development, urban planning, and urban design. UROP students will meet biweekly with Professor Ryan and report on a weekly basis to Mr. Gao. Any questions may be addressed to Mr. Gao at the address below. This UROP is available to students who wish to receive stipends, course credit, or on a volunteer basis.

Prerequisites: Proficiency in English; GIS skill; excellent communication skills; interest in urban planning and policy.

Relevant URLs:

http://www.youngstownohio.gov/about_youngstown/youngstown_2010/index.aspx

http://www.cityofyoungstownoh.org/city_hall/department

Contact: Shuqi Gao: shuqigao@mit.edu


5/8/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Chemical Engineering (Course 10)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Prof. J. Christopher Love

Project Title: Serverless Application System for Storage and analYsis of –Omic Data (SASSY-OD)

Project Description: We are developing a new framework to store and analyze biological (–omic) and other scientific datasets and securely share them across labs and institutions, based on cutting-edge tools provided by Amazon cloud. Recent advancements in “serverless” computing and container technology let us implement infrastructure-as-a-code that scales with our demands, is friendly to most users, and removes the burden of server administration.

If you enjoy doing big things with third-party APIs, or invent your own, we invite you to join in! We’re actively working on back-end APIs and their front-end UI. Knowledge of Node.js, TypeScript or JavaScript in general would be very helpful, but not required (and we know you learn fast!). We’d also like to borrow your experience designing and implementing sleek single-page applications (SPAs) in Angular or similar web frameworks, as well as general practice of test- and behavior-driven development and continuous delivery. And if you are familiar with intricacies of AWS and following its latest developments, we’ll pick you yesterday!

Timeline: We aim to move fast and break things, while also getting a full production system ready by the end of the summer. And researchers at the Koch Institute are looking forward to use it for an exciting new technology in RNA sequencing of single cells that will likely cross academic institutions, and beyond.

Contact: Denis Loginov <dloginov@mit.edu>


5/3/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research (WI)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Rick Young

Project Title: Interpreting genetic predisposition to disease

Project Description: The Corradin lab is looking for motivated students interested in applying computational skills to biological questions. This project is offered for Summer term with opportunity for continuation during the school year. UROP student will perform high-throughput, integrative analyses of large datasets to assess the molecular consequence of genetic variation.

Determining genetic variants that predispose to common disease provides essential insights into the pathogenesis of human disorders. Rather than impact protein-coding genes, the majority of disease risk loci co-localize with functional regulatory elements, such as transcriptional enhancers. Transcriptional enhancer elements are noncoding regions of the genome that play a critical role in regulating gene expression programs. As such, perturbation of enhancer function can alter quantitative, spatial and temporal regulation of gene expression. Identifying the functional consequence of such noncoding variation remains a significant challenge and thus limits the translation of disease-association to clinically actionable findings.

Prerequisites: Candidates with a strong background in programming and an interest in biology and/or genetics are encouraged to apply. Candidates must have familiarity with Python, Unix/Bash, R, and/or perl.

Relevant URLs: http://wi.mit.edu/people/fellows/corradin

Contact: If interested, please send CV/resume and detail your computational experience/relevant course work to Olivia Corradin corradin@wi.mit.edu


5/3/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Materials Science and Engineering (Course 3)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Prof. Christopher Schuh

Project Title: Transparent Ceramic Single Crystals

Project Description: We are developing a bulk ceramic material that is optically transparent that has uses in optics as well as precision consumer/industrial parts.

The project involves fabrication of bulk single crystals followed by characterization of the quality and orientation of the crystals. Mechanical and optical tests will also be carried out to determine the strength and quality. We are looking for a student who are comfortable working in a lab and curious to learn a variety of experimental techniques. We will introduce the student to many materials analysis techniques that are critical for modern materials scientists such as optical and electron microscopy, composition spectroscopy, x-ray and electron diffraction methods, and general metallurgical sample preparation.

This project will provide a solid basis for many of the most common techniques and concepts in materials science but we are also looking for an independent student who can provide their ideas and input and who can take initiative when needed.

Prerequisites: Prior experimental laboratory experience a plus. Work hours are flexible but ideally looking for at least 20h/week.

Contact: Alan Lai: alanlai@mit.edu


5/3/17

Summer 2017

Department/Lab/Center: CSAIL

Faculty Supervisor: Julie Shah

Project Title: AI monitoring of human planning dialogues

Project Description:  The Interactive Robotics Group is currently looking for a highly motivated individual who can help us develop a novel team messaging software with an intelligent agent integration.  The agent will monitor team planning dialogues and offer real-time planning support. The primary tasks of the UROP will consist of developing the novel team messaging software and collecting human planning dataset through Amazon Mechanical Turk.  

Requirements:

  • Strong skills in both frontend and backend web development
  • Prior experience with Amazon Mechanical Turk is a huge plus
  • Self-driven, enthusiastic, and organized individual

Skills you will likely learn: Automated task planning, plan recognition, human-computer interaction, experimental design

Contact: Interested applicants should contact Joseph Kim (jokim@mit.edu). In your email, please include a resume (or a CV) and a few sentences describing your interests in this project. 


5/3/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Chemical Engineering (Course 10)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Prof. William H. Green

Project Title: Automatic Solvent Selection and Optimization for Reaction Pathway Design

Project Description: We are developing a program that can design reaction pathways to synthesize organic molecules in a microfluidic platform. For computer-proposed synthesis pathways, solvent selection is critical for further experimental evaluation. UROPs in this project will develop a program to select solvents for each reaction step in a pathway in order to minimize separation steps and to minimize the overall usage and cost of solvents. The UROP will be supervised by Dr. Yuran Wang and closely interact with the cross-disciplinary team (Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, and EECS).

Prerequisites: We are seeking a highly motivated undergraduate with a basic understanding of solvation and the role of solvents in reactions, and good computer programming skills. Prior programming experience with Python is a plus.

Contact: Yuran Wang: yrwang@mit.edu


5/3/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Media Laboratory

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Mitchel Resnick

Project Title: Web-based data-driven interactive timeline app for Scratch users

Project Description: Want to help develop a website for millions of kids around the world? With Scratch, kids can program their own interactive stories, games, and animations — and share creations with others in the online community.

We are developing a web app that dynamically generates a personalized web-based visualization of a user's journey on Scratch by highlighting their key experiences, projects, and connections in the online community. The project processes public data from Scratch API and utilizes Javascript to generate a customized timeline video for a given username. You will be working on adding and implementing many interesting interactive features to the web app. You will also be optimizing the code to efficiently handle different types of Scratch users, and get an opportunity to explore and experiment with other playful ideas for the app.

Prerequisites: Interested students should have experience in web design and development (must have fluency in HTML, CSS, Javascript etc.)

Relevant URLs: scratch.mit.edu

Contact: Shruti Dhariwal: shrutid@media.mit.edu


5/3/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Chemical Engineering (Course 10)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Michael Strano

Project Title: Development of imaging systems and sensor platforms for continuous biomonitoring in vivo

Project Description: The overall goal of this work involves using single walled carbon nanotube sensors capable of detecting certain biomolecules and transitioning them to a continuous sensing platform in live animals. The project has a number of facets. One aspect of the project involves the development and troubleshooting of the imaging system to image animals over a long period of time to detect the changes in sensor response. Additionally, optimization of the implant is critical to maintain sensitivity in biological environments.  Overall the students can gain skills in optics, nanomaterials, and hydrogel chemistry.  It should be noted students will not need to work with animals for this project.

Prerequisites: no prerequisites required

Contact: Naveed Bakh: bakh@mit.edu


5/3/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Brain and Cognitive Sciences (Course 9)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Pawan Sinha

Project Title: Development of Face Processing in Children with Late Sight Onset

Project Description: The overall goal of Project Prakash is to provide treatment to curably blind children and study their subsequent visual development. In particular, we have been studying the development of object and concept formation following recovery from prolonged congenital blindness. Project Prakash uniquely allows us to investigate this developmental progression from the earliest stages both behaviorally and with brain imaging tools. In this study, we shall focus on basic face detection ability and on face identification.  Specifically, our goal is to develop a battery of standardized person identification tests that can be used to determine the developmental progression of recovering face, body and general person identification after sight onset.  The UROP will contribute to planning and preparing behavioral, eye-tracking and EEG experiments, as well as with the data analysis, using  mostly photoshop, matlab and excel.  The student will work closely with a post-doc in the lab, and will communicate closely with the India-based research team to ensure proper data collection. Additionally, the student will have substantial opportunity to work independently. This position is available for pay or credit.

Prerequisites: The ideal candidate will have a strong interest in face processing and/or development, as well as previous experience in MATLAB and photoshop, and strong analytical skills. Significant advantage for willingness to continue into the fall semester with a 6-10 hour commitment. A background in computer science, engineering, brain and cognitive sciences, or related field is desired.

Relevant URLs: www.projectprakash.org

Contact: Sharon Gutnick: sharongu@mit.edu


5/3/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Biological Engineering (Course 20)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Forest White

Project Title: Identification of Novel Peptides through design of a custom RNA-seq database

Project Description: This student will work to develop a pipeline to create custom RNA-seq databases that can be used to identify novel or cancer specific peptides that are presented to the immune system.

Currently, we search our Mass Spectrometry data against a human proteome database, but we are in need of someone to create custom databases that include single amino acid polymorphisms, INDELs, splice junction peptides, and more. A recent paper "Wen et al. BMC Bioinformatics" discusses how this can be accomplished, but we are looking for a UROP to take on this project. Other potential projects may include using computational modeling approaches on large phosphor-proteomic datasets generated by the lab on normal and cancerous tissue samples if interested.

Prerequisites:

  • Comfortable using command line interface, following documentation on how to use different software packages, and experience with several computer languages including R, Matlab, Java, or others.
  • A strong background in biology is not required, this is largely a computational project and will be very independent.

Relevant URLs: http://bmcbioinformatics.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12859-016-1133-3

Contact: Lauren Stopfer: lstopfer@mit.edu


5/3/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Plasma Science and Fusion Center (PSFC)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Richard Petrasso

Project Title: Inertial Confinement Fusion neutron spectrometer response function simulations with Geant4/C++

Project Description: The High-Energy-Density Physics (HEDP) Division http://www-internal.psfc.mit.edu/research/hedp/ of the PSFC designs and implements experiments, and performs theoretical calculations, to study and explore the non-linear dynamics and properties of plasmas under extreme conditions of density (~1000 g/cc), pressure (~ 1000 gigabar), and field strength (~megagauss).  As part of this effort, the group has installed the MRS neutron spectrometer to measure the yield, ion temperature and confinement properties of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) ignition experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF).

MRS measurements from the NIF are interpreted using a detailed instrument response function simulated using the Geant4 toolkit (geant4.cern.ch). 

We are currently looking for a student to:

  • adapt the existing response function simulation code to the newest version of Geant4;
  • move the code from a Windows to a Linux computing environment;
  • add more physics capability to the code to further improve our understanding of MRS response.

Prerequisites: The right candidate for this project is a self-motivated student with prior experience in C++ and Linux. Geant4 experience would be an advantage. Hours for this project will be negotiable, during Summer 2017.

Relevant URLs: http://www.psfc.mit.edu/

Contact: For questions and to apply, please email Maria Gatu Johnson, gatu@psfc.mit.edu


5/3/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Sloan School of Management (Course 15)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Yasheng Huang

Project Title: Data Identification for Food Safety in China

Project Description: The goal of this project is to find Chinese data sources that will help our understanding and managing of risk associated with the intentional adulteration of food supply chains (i.e., poultry, beef, pork, milk, seafood, and produce) in China. The data sources may go beyond food industry and cover economy, consumer behavior, and trade. In addition, the UROP will perform background research on the Chinese regulatory system and CFDA (related to food). Our aim is to map out potentially contaminated food suppliers using this data, creating a real-time social sensor of food safety in China.

Prerequisites: The focus here will be on identifying Chinese websites so ability to read and understand Chinese is essential and also the ability to write research reports and research summaries will be critical.

Contact: Channa Yem: channay@mit.edu


4/28/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Nuclear Science and Engineering (Course 22)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Dr. Elisabeth Reynolds

Project Title: Advanced Manufacturing and the Future of Work

Project Description: MIT’s Industrial Performance Center (IPC) engages in research on firms, industries and technological change in the global economy and how their emergence and transformation impact society at large. We look in particular at systems of innovation, whether within firms, industries, regions or countries (http://ipc.mit.edu). We are seeking a UROP for the Summer of 2017 to assist in research related to the topic of advanced manufacturing and the future of work.

Developments in manufacturing technologies, combined with changing economics of manufacturing in the global economy, are creating new opportunities for the location and spatial configuration of production. As firms engage in mass customization in smaller facilities, rethink the geographic distribution of their supply chains to reduce lead times, better integrate manufacturing with research and development to enhance innovation, and use new advanced manufacturing technologies that require higher skills and more connectivity, the possibilities for where and how 21st century manufacturing occurs open up in ways that have been largely inconceivable in the past several decades.

In the U.S., a renewed focus on the importance of manufacturing to the health and future growth of the U.S. economy has highlighted the need to maintain and build manufacturing capabilities to support economic growth, good jobs, and national security. Importantly, they have linked the nation’s manufacturing capabilities to its ability to innovate. At the same time, there is deep anxiety that the digitization of the workplace will lead to the displacement of workers by robotics and AI.

The IPC Summer 2017 UROP will be focused primarily on helping to develop a literature review and conducting secondary research on developments in advanced manufacturing, whether they be technological, organizational or locational and how these might impact jobs and the workplace. This work may take the form of looking at public policies related to advanced manufacturing in different countries (i.e., the U.S., Brazil, Germany and China) or on specific industries (i.e., textiles, clean energy, automotive), or in new collaborations/partnership models that are trying to encourage greater investment in manufacturing and in the education and training of workers (i.e., the new Manufacturing Innovation Institutes in the US).

Prerequisites: Strong analytic skills are required to potentially work with data sets. In addition, the UROP should have knowledge of powerpoint, and have good writing and interpersonal skills.

The UROP will work 10-20 hours a week at standard UROP pay per hour and report to the Executive Director of the IPC, Dr. Elisabeth Reynolds.

Contact: Laura Guild: lguild@mit.edu


4/28/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Media Laboratory

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Kent Larson

Project Title: Emergent Urban Data Mining & Visualization Platform (Javascript)

Project Description: The Changing Places Group at the Media Lab is experimenting with the deployment of an emergent, open-source, voxel-based data visualization platform to increase citizen data literacy and participation in public policy.  In the first phase of the project we will be working on the continuous development of an open-source online geospatial mapping application that presents an alternative paradigm to urban mapping and analysis interfaces.  Subsequently, we will extend its application to mobility simulation and CityScope (LEG0-based simulation interface).

Successful UROP will have the option to further develop the project into a senior-year, super-UROP project through 6.UAR.

COMPENSATION: Paid, 40hrs per week (early-June ~ late-August).  Potential for middle authorship on one or more groundbreaking journal articles.

Prerequisites:  We are seeking a highly-motivated UROP with an interest in online application development, spatial data management, and machine-learning.

Required Skills:

  • Fluency in Javascript, both for backend, and front-end.
  • Node.js
  • Database management practices and SQL
  • Familiarity with front-end development (CSS, HTML5)

Desired Skills:

  • React.js or Angular.
  • d3 or three.js
  • GIS software and tools (ArcGIS or QGIS)
  • PostGIS

Relevant URLs: http://paintingwithdata.mit.edu/

Contact: Phil Tinn: ptinn@media.mit.edu


4/28/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Media Laboratory

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Kent Larson

Project Title: Human Robot Interaction for Autonomous Mobile Robots

Project Description: The Future Mobility Team at the Media Lab is developing a new generation mobility platform and urban infrastructure to revolutionize the way we move people and goods in cities.  In contrast with the industry’s dominant car-centric approach of concentrating on the 4-wheel automobile and its driver-centric UI, the Media Lab focuses on the human-scale, pedestrian-friendly mobility solutions that bring more convenience, style and well-being to contemporary urban life.

Transforming the scale and technology of the vehicle also necessitates a redefinition of the communication between human and the computer/robot in order to enable co-existence, trust and collaboration between the two.  This role calls for a highly creative technologist to join the Future Mobility Team to contribute to shaping a new category of HCI and potentially universalize a new language and the way of communication.

Reference: https://www.pubpub.org/pub/extended-intelligence

COMPENSATION: Paid, 40hrs per week (early-June ~ late-August).  Potential for middle authorship on one or more groundbreaking journal articles.

Prerequisites: With experience in one or several of the following areas:

  • C++
  • Python
  • ROS
  • 6.835: Intelligent Multi-Modal User Interfaces

Relevant URLs: http://cp.media.mit.edu/pev

Contact: Phil Tinn: ptinn@media.mit.edu


4/25/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Media Laboratory

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Joi Ito

Project Title: Media Lab Community Biotechnology Initiative

Project Description: Come join the Media Laboratory’s new Community Biotechnology Initiative, led by Dr. David Sun Kong! As living technologies proliferate, how do we ensure that communities, diverse socioeconomically, culturally, and creatively, are able to not only experience its benefits, but are also active participants and agents of change?

Through this new Initiative, we aim to empower communities through biotechnology by developing accessible open-source bio-hardware, virtual infrastructure for sharing, and also organizing impactful community programming.

We seek two UROP students to join our summer team. 

Projects include:

  • Research on robust, low-cost solutions versions of cutting edge bio-technologies;
  • Design and fabrication of new micro- and milli-fluidic technologies for synthetic biology;
  • The continued development of ‘Metafluidics,’ an open repository of bio-hardware;
  • Work on ‘Biota Beats,’ a ‘microbial record player’ that translates micro-organisms of the body to sound;
  • Organizing the first annual International Community Biology Summit, a gathering of community and independent bio labs around the world at the Media Lab

Prerequisites:

  • a desire to utilize biotechnology as a means to create a more just, equitable society
  • curiosity, enthusiasm, and a passion for learning

Experience & Skills (preferred but optional):

  • basic wet lab experience, including molecular and micro-biology techniques;
  • microfluidic design and fabrication;
  • experience with fabrication technologies and hardware development, with biology applications a plus;
  • proficiency with wordpress and/or other web development platforms and tools;
  • community organizing experience

Contact: David Sun Kong, Ph.D. dkong@mit.edu


4/25/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Sloan School of Management (Course 15)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Hazhir Rahmandad

Project Title: Impact of rapid feedback on classroom learning

Project Description: Can we enhance student learning through provision of more frequent and automated feedback? We plan to assess this question in the context of the system dynamics course offered at Sloan (15.871/2) , using an automatically graded set of short exercises. The UROP will work on designing and coding the test questions and their feedback scheme into EdX platform and pilot-testing the results, with the opportunity to continue on the project in the data collection and analysis phase in Fall.

This is a paid research position for summer.

Prerequisites:

  • Some familiarity with Python is required.
  • Familiarity with system dynamics is a plus but not required.

Contact: Hazhir Rahmandad: hazhir@mit.edu


4/25/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Sloan School of Management (Course 15)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Hazhir Rahmandad

Project Title: Can we build good jobs in low cost services? Studies using online experiments and data analytics

Project Description: As globalization and automation shift employment towards services, new jobs are increasingly in low cost service sector, typically with low salaries, unpredictable hours, and dim growth prospects. Are subpar jobs  in this sector sector an inevitable outcome of profit maximizing firms or could good jobs be designed into this setting? We are conducting multiple research projects to tackle this problem. In one, we use data from a large retail chain and advanced statistical methods to identify the strength of mechanisms that could enable good jobs. This project can benefit from UROPs with strong programming skills for implementation of estimation method. In another related project we plan to use online experiments, e.g. using Amazon mechanical Turk, to assess some of the challenges in transitioning from poor jobs to good jobs, in a management flight simulator that simulates relevant organizational dynamics. The UROP will help with building of the simulator and conduct of experiments online.

This summer UROP is a paid position, open to both MIT and eligible non-MIT UROP participants, and with the potential for extended engagement in Fall and beyond.

Prerequisites: No prerequisits, but preference for coding experience, and for some familiarity with simulation methods and differential equations.

Contact: Hazhir Rahmandad: hazhir@mit.edu


4/25/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Media Laboratory

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Hiroshi Ishii

Project Title: 3D printing auxetic materials

Project Description: This is an on-going research that looks into the various types of linkage structure that can be computationally assembled to achieve extraordinary properties such as negative poisson ratio, tunable porosity, or foldability. The task of the position is to write script to model the structure in CAD software and simulate transformation. The goal is to create a fully 3D printed material for future footwear design by the end of the summer.

Prerequisites:

  • Programming skill in Java,  C++
  • experience in computer graphics is a plus.
  • experience in grasshopper is a plus.

Contact: Jifei Ou: jifei@mit.edu


4/25/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Chemical Engineering (Course 10)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Daniel Anderson and Robert Langer

Project Title: Nanoparticles for Glucose Responsive Insulin Delivery

Project Description: Diabetes mellitus is a class of diseases in which the body either does not produce or is insensitive to insulin. This results in poorly controlled blood glucose levels, often leading to severe complications including heart disease, stroke, and kidney failure. An attractive diabetes therapy is self-regulated delivery of insulin to functionally recapitulate deficient insulin production or signaling. In order for a self-regulated system to be therapeutically relevant, it must rapidly respond to changes in physiological glucose concentrations. To achieve this goal, acetal-functionalized dextran (Ac-dex) is synthesized and formulated into nanoparticles encapsulating insulin, glucose oxidase (GOx). GOx converts glucose to gluconic acid and reduces the pH in the microenvironment of the nanoparticles. The acetal groups are subsequently cleaved from the polymer in an acid catalyzed reaction, solubilizing the native dextran and releasing the insulin. The specific goal of this UROP is to optimize the formulation of these nanoparticles to increase the distinction between high glucose and low glucose conditions. Laboratory skills that will be learned include nanoparticle formulation and synthesis, characterization techniques such as dynamic light scattering, release studies, and protein quantification, among others.

Prerequisites: Prior laboratory experience is preferred but not required. Preferred candidates will complete the UROP for credit or volunteer.

Contact: Lisa Volpatti: volpatti@mit.edu


4/25/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Media Laboratory

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Mitchel Resnick

Project Title: Learning Innovators Middle East

Project Description: The MIT Media Lab Learning Initiative is developing a learning innovation accelerator program for the Middle East. The program will train and enable a cohort of learning technology developers in the Middle East to develop education solutions for refugees.

The project will work with bright young people from the Middle East region, who already have some tech proficiency and an interest in further developing these skills. They will be offered online courses on digital pedagogy, and refugee education; the program incorporates project-based learning, mentorship and an emphasis on peer-to-peer learning.

We are looking for a motivated summer UROPs to help us pick online courses, come up with course material, and design activities for the scholars to take. There will also be opportunities to contribute to the development of the platform.

Prerequisites: Experience with online educational platforms and curriculum design (bonus: experience taking MOOCs).  Passion about online learning and refugee issues; Arabic language skills a plus.

Bonus: Experience with full stack web development

Relevant URLs: https://lime.media.mit.edu/

Contact: Noor Eddin Amer: namer@mit.edu


4/25/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Brain and Cognitive Sciences (Course 9)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Dr. Joshua Tenenbaum

Project Title: Program ipad games for experiments with kids!

Project Description: Hi! We are in need of some help from someone who has experience programming iPad games/apps to help us make stimuli for experiments with kids! The games are rather primitive and involve a touch screen.

Start date: ASAP :)

The work is based around this paper: http://science.sciencemag.org/content/350/6266/1332.full

Prerequisites: Programming in javascript or ability to program iPad game/app

Here is an example of a game someone else made: https://cbmm.github.io/drawcopy/?overlap

Relevant URLs: http://cocosci.mit.edu/

Contact: Eliza Kosoy: Eko@mit.edu


4/25/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Media Laboratory

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Mitchel Resnick

Project Title: MIT Media Lab Learning Initiative Web Presence

Project Description: The Media Lab Learning Initiative is working to support many online and offline communities who learn together, grounded in the 4Ps of creative learning: projects, passion, peers, and play. To support these kinds of earning environments, we design playful and friendly web tools and sites. We work with communities of librarians, K12 STEM teachers, non-profit and public sector social impact organization leaders, and MOOC students.

We are looking for motivated MIT undergraduates to help us build these tools and sites -- contributing to the playful and friendly UX and building out front-end UI. This UROP opportunity is great for anyone who is interested in building out their web-development skills and portfolio. It will also be an opportunity to learn about how the Media Lab is tinkering with learning and education.

Prerequisites:

  • Experience with online learning or online communities
  • Experience with user testing and reporting bugs
  • Passion about community-based online learning
  • Experience with HTML/CSS, React, Jekyll, or Django

Contact: Katherine McConachie: kamcco@media.mit.edu


4/25/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Media Laboratory

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Kent Larson

Project Title: Self-Driving Vehicle Impact Simulation

Project Description: The Future Mobility Team at the Media Lab is developing a new generation mobility platform and urban infrastructure to revolutionize the way we move people and goods in cities.  By combing robotics, electrification and vehicle-sharing, we are creating a new category of vehicles that addresses the common last-mile commuting gap and is compatible with the pedestrian, car-lite urban environment of the future.

This role calls for a highly motivated UROP to creatively apply Computer Science and open-source tools to building a fleet simulator for shared autonomous vehicles (Prototype: https://vimeo.com/163026256).  Successful UROP will have the option to further develop the simulator into a senior-year, super-UROP project through 6.UAR.

Join our team if you like the following

  • Test or further develop your skill-set in engineering, design or urban planning.
  • Learn the development process of autonomous and platform-scale technology Media Lab-style through working with a large team of peers from diverse disciplines.
  • Have the opportunity to travel overseas to conduct workshops and deploy pilot vehicles or simulation tools.

Project Website: http://cp.media.mit.edu/pev

Compensation: Paid, 40hrs per week (early-June ~ late-August); potential for middle authorship on one or more groundbreaking journal articles.

We look for experience in one or several of the following areas:

  • Python (Strong)
  • 6.006 Introduction to Algorithms
  • System Dynamics
  • Microscopic Modeling
  • Agent-based Modeling

Contact: Phil Tinn: ptinn@mit.edu


4/25/17

Summer

Department/Lab/Center: Media Lab

Faculty Supervisor: Alex `Sandy' Pentland

Project Title:  Rhythm Badge: an Open-Source wearable for quantifying face-to-face interaction

Project Description: We are developing a platform for quantifying, analyzing and improving team collaboration outside the lab in real-life situations. One of its components is the Rhythm Badge - a wearable devices for quantifying face-to-face communication.

We are looking for an electrical engineer can work on two new features:

1. Beamforming. Designing a simple beamforming circuit with two microphones to improve improve the signal quality from the speaker (ignoring sounds from other sources) Familiarity with Digital Signal Processing, noise cancellation algorithms a plus

2. Accelerometer. Adding an accelerometer to track body movement and control the device

Skills you need to already have: Embedded programming (Embedded C or Arduino), experience designing audio circuits and/or mixed signal applications. Good with schematics and know how to use an oscilloscope to trace through a signal path.

Optional skills: PCB design, Familiarity with Low Energy Bluetooth, Familiarity with Nordic nRF51/52 series

Other prerequisites: we are looking for students that are able to contribute a minimum of 30 hours per week during the summer.

Contact: Oren Lederman (orenled@media.mit.edu) with a short description of your background or resume.


4/4/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Materials Science and Engineering (Course 3)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Chris Schuh

Project Title: Computer Modeling of Metallic Glass and Shape Memory Ceramics

Project Description: Our lab (and its affiliates) have developed well-respected mesoscale computational models for metallic glass and shape memory ceramics over the last decade; the slowest part of these models is execution of the finite element method. In the last several months, we have developed strategies that speed up this finite element execution step by 150x or more. This speed-up enables us to study larger problems in greater detail than ever before. We are seeking students to take ownership of these models, to implement new speed-up strategies, and to run new experiments with the accelerated model. The student will also possibly develop code for use with our NSF XSEDE supercomputer allocation.

An opportunity to learn:

  • C++
  • Scientific computing methods
  • Finite Element Method
  • Supercomputing
  • Mesoscale materials modeling

Compensation: This UROP is paid or volunteer depending on the student's preference.  Potential for middle authorship on one or more groundbreaking journal articles

Timeline: This is a computational project, so work hours are very flexible, but the student is expected to work part- or full-time on this project over the summer.

Required Skills:

  • Strong programming skills
  • Basic knowledge of linear algebra
  • Basic (3.012-level) understanding of kinetics, structure, mechanics, and thermodynamics of materials

Preferred Skills:

  • C++ (or enthusiasm about learning it)
  • Interest in pursuing the project for multiple semesters

Contact: Thomas J. Hardin: hardin@mit.edu


4/14/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies (ISN)

Faculty Supervisor: John Joannopoulos 

Project Title: Hyperprecise Mapping 

Project Description: The ISN has an infrastructure project planned for this summer that would involve the development and fielding of a wireless network, as well as a location-aware capture device, to assist in the 3-D (SLAM) mapping of a public area of MIT, likely the Bldg 32 tunnels. As well as serving as a proof-of-concept for the precision location hardware and software the team is building, it will generate an open data formatted DB of the area mapped, which could be used by other student projects. This will leverage existing projects from previous years and products derived from the ISN Soldier Design Contest.

Contact: Kurt Keville: kkeville@mit.edu


4/14/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Sloan School of Management (Course 15)

Faculty Supervisor: Erik Brynjolfsson

Project Title: Machine Learning, Tasks, and Employment

Project Description: We are working on a project to predict the diffusion of machine learning through the economy. Opportunities to apply machine learning in business contexts are varied, but the impact on workers and companies is likely to be heterogeneous. We're looking for outstanding undergraduates to join a research team for the summer to assist in classification tasks and to help process large datasets.

Prerequisites: Programming skills in Python or R preferred. Other languages are a plus. Applicants must have an interest in economics.

Contact: Daniel Rock: drock@mit.edu


4/14/17

Summer

Department, Lab or Center: Comparative Media Studies (21 CMS)

Faculty Supervisor: Eric Klopfer

Project Title: VR Games to teach Scale in Biology

Project Description: Virtual reality (VR) technologies offer a paradigm shift in the ways humans interact with each other and the world around them. With the advent of low-cost user-friendly tools, VR also has the potential to profoundly change not only how students learn but also the essence of “learning environments” themselves. The capability and feasibility of VR as an educational tool has grown yet there are few resources for information on we know very little about how to design, implement, and measure engaging and effective VR-enabled learning tools for K-12 settings.

To tackle this, the MIT Game Lab and MIT Education Arcade will develop and pilot test a proof-of-concept VR activity for a high school audience that leverages the affordances of VR (helmet and hand controllers) to enable meaningful immersion and presence within the VR world. The learning goals for this project are to help students understand concepts of scale, particularly as it applies to biology.

We will be creating a collaborative team-based game in which at least one student will be in VR manipulating 3D structures (molecules, proteins, DNA) while the ‘mission control’ students direct the student in VR space using other computing hardware or resources. We are looking for 4-5 UROPs to develop the prototypes and the in-game assets this summer, for testing in high school labs in the Fall. UROPs hired can continue to work on the project during the 2017-2018 school year as well (this is an 18-month project).

UROP Team Responsibilities:

  • Working alongside and reporting to Game Lab/Education Arcade staff developers
  • Development of both VR and mission control games, likely in Unity, for the Oculus Rift and Oculus Touch controllers
  • Designing and modeling 3D assets for use in-game, of molecules, proteins, DNA, and cells
  • Testing prototypes with students and teachers

Prerequisites: Experience we’re hoping for in our UROP team (you can learn this over the summer if you don’t have this already and no one is expected to have all of this):

  • Unity and/or C#
  • developing for VR headsets and/or Oculus Touch
  • 3D modeling and animation

Relevant URLs: http://education.mit.eduhttp://gamelab.mit.edu

Contact: Philip Tan: philip@mit.edu


4/14/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Urban Studies and Planning (Course 11)

Faculty Supervisor: Carlo Ratti

Project Title: Wireless Device-based Population Tracking

Project Description: At Senseable City Lab, we are developing a network system that can track and map the movement trajectories of WIFI/Bluetooth-enabled device users by analyzing communication signals from the device. The system consists of hardware that can detect and analyze WIFI/Bluetooth communication signals, and software (algorithm) that enable the coordination of the devices to associate each signal with a device user and to track each individual user. We are deploying the system to collect data, to infer the movement behavior of visitors in a well-structured area such museums, and to assess the effect of external stimuli on the behavior. Successful candidates will have a unique opportunity to work in a multi-disciplinary project that involves system engineering, computer science, and data analytics.

We are looking for 1-2 students who will work on 1) integrating a wireless module (H/W) that can detect and monitor WIFI/Bluetooth communication signals; and on 2) designing software/algorithms that realize the coordination among the wireless modules for tracking and data transmission.

Prerequisites:

  • Knowledge of WIFI and Bluetooth communication systems
  • Knowledge of how to use Arduino and Raspberry Pi
  • Programming skills in C/C++ and Python

Relevant URLs: http://senseable.mit.edu/louvre/

Contact: Yuji Yoshimura: yyoshi@mit.edu


4/14/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Mechanical Engineering (Course 2)

Faculty Supervisor: Michael Triantafyllou

Project Title: Design and Fabrication of Wave Absorption Beach

Project Description: The MIT Towing Tank (48-015) is replacing its wave absorption beach. Our facility generates water waves, traveling down a long 30m tank, to then be absorbed on the other side. These waves are used for the flow testing of model ships, offshore wind turbines, or unsteady flow sensors.  The UROP would be expected to help with large-scale fabrication, underwater structure installation, and detailed part design.

Prerequisites: Strongly motivated with an interest in the material. Machining experience (2.670 or significant experience beyond 2.007), basic knowledge of fluid mechanics (2.005). Hobbyshop, Makerworks, or N52 shop involvement would be ideal, especially lathe/mill/welding training. Swimming proficiency required for safety. Rising junior or sophomore preferred.

Relevant URLs: http://web.mit.edu/towtank/www/

Contact: Jacob Izraelevitz: jsi@mit.edu


4/14/17

Summer 2017

Department/Lab/Center: Media Lab

Faculty Supervisor(s): Hugh Herr

Project Title: Development of an online prosthesis design and education platform using Autodesk Forge

Project Description: Different regions of the world have unique approaches to developing prosthetics depending on resource availability, patient demands, and practical methods. Numerous online learning resources are available for amputees and prosthetists to gain a more comprehensive understanding of prosthetic limbs. However, most of these resources are hard to access and they do not provide sufficient up-to-date information. While CAD is becoming popular for prosthetic design, it has not reached a level at which a prosthetist feels confident enough to abandon the conventional methods of creating a prosthetic socket.

This project aims to develop an online cloud-based design and educational environment for prosthetists and amputees that not only encourages the use of digital tools, but also fosters a community around developing innovative solutions in prosthetic design. This project began as a summer research project, and we are now seeking a student to take over the project. Autodesk Forge has graciously provided some initial funding and has offered to provide expert guidance for the project. This is a fantastic opportunity for a student who is interested in design education, building up their CAD skills, and gaining more experience with app development and API’s.

This position will require that you make use of Autodesk Forge, so experience with app development and API’s is preferred.

Prerequisite and Requirements:  Candidates must have basic proficiency in Autodesk CAD software, with preference to those who have experience with app development and API’s.

About us: http://biomech.media.mit.edu

Contact: Please email Bryan Ranger (branger@mit.edu) if you are interested.  Send an attached resume, list of relevant coursework or unofficial transcript, and hours per week desired for the summer.  Feel free to include a link to any relevant projects you have worked on. 


4/14/17

Summer

Department/Lab/Center: Women and Gender Studies (WGS)

Faculty Supervisor: Dr. Brittany Charlton

Project Description Dr. Brittany Charlton is offering a new practicum opportunity in the summer of 2017 to help investigate the reproductive health of sexual minorities (i.e., lesbian and bisexual individuals). The student will aid Dr. Charlton’s team with a scoping review focused on the reproductive health of sexual minority girls and women. The team hypothesizes that, compared to heterosexual girls and women, sexual minority girls and women will: 1) initiate sex at an earlier age and have more partners, including male partners; 2) be less likely to use the HPV vaccination, Pap tests, and contraceptives; and 3) be more likely to have experienced STIs, unintended and teen pregnancies, and abortion. Additionally, the team hypothesizes there will be differences in some outcomes by sexual minority subgroups (e.g., lesbians will be less likely than bisexuals to use the HPV vaccine). Responsibilities may include running literature searches, extracting articles, and developing new protocols for upcoming extensions of this work. 

Qualifications/Skills Needed: Applications are welcome from students at both MIT and Wellesley College.  Students should apply who have with an interest in medicine, public health, epidemiology, gender studies, social sciences, humanities, health disparities, social determinants, sexual minority/LGBT populations, discrimination, public policy, maternal child health, adolescent health, or reproductive/sexual health. Preferably the applicant will have prior research experience, though this is not a requirement.  Work may be done remotely though will require occasional meetings with Dr. Charlton’s team on Harvard Medical School’s campus in Boston.

Compensation This opportunity is available to students for direct funding via the UROP Office or for academic credit. Students must commit a minimum of twenty hours per week (though thirty to forty hours would be preferred) to the position for at least ten weeks of the summer. Depending on the time commitment, authorship opportunities may be available for subsequent publications (e.g., academic papers, abstracts, posters).

Relevant websitewww.brittanycharlton.com or www.hsph.harvard.edu/sogie/ 

Contact Interested students should email a CV and brief cover letter (including your available time commitment):

Dr. Brittany M. Charlton, ScD 

Instructor, Boston Children's Hospital & Harvard Medical School 

Lecturer, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

300 Longwood Ave, Boston, MA 02115 

bmc@mit.edu


4/11/17

Department/Lab/Center: Aero/Astro (Course 16)

Faculty Supervisor: Kerri Cahoy

Project Description: We have (at least) 4 openings for four paid summer UROP positions in the Space, Telecommunications, Astronomy and Radiation Laboratory this summer working on integration and test of a flight nanosatellite laser communications terminal (the Nanosatellite Optical Downlink Experiment project)

Optics (2 students): Simulate and build a laser communications transmitter and beacon receive system that fits on a CubeSat. This work involves learning and using modeling software tools, such as Zemax, as hands-on work with optomechanical elements and fast steering mirrors.

Mechanical (2 students): Solidworks CAD refinement, 3D prototype printing, developing drawings to send out for machining, and assembly and testing of the flight housing for the Nanosatellite Optical Downlink Experiment.

Competitive pay based on experience, and flexible scheduling (to accommodate summer/family plans). Also happy to consider electronics board design and test and software/programming applicants.

Contact: Feel free to apply solo or as a team; emailkcahoy@mit.edudcbarnes@mit.edu and raniceto@mit.edu for more information.


4/11/17

Department/Lab/Center: Urban Studies and Planning (Course 11)

Faculty Supervisor: Carlo Ratti

Project Title: Treepedia

Project Description: We've developed a metric - the Green View Index - by which to evaluate and compare canopy cover in cities around the world. In collaboration with the World Economic Forum, we're growing this database to span the globe. To do this, we need your help! Come work on an exciting project that's getting a lot of media attention (just Google Treepedia!). With your help, we want to scale to build a global platform mapping the urban canopy.

Prerequisites: Looking for 1-2 student(s) in computer science or urban studies and planning (or relevant field), proficient in GIS and python. An interest in urban ecology is a plus.

URL: senseable.mit.edu/treepedia

Contact: Newsha Ghaeli ghaeli@mit.edu


4/11/17

Department/Lab/Center: Urban Studies and Planning (Course 11)

Faculty Supervisor: Carlo Ratti

Project Title: Roboat

Project Description: As self-driving cars hit the road, autonomous boats are entering Amsterdam’s canals. The ‘roboat’ project — a research collaboration between MIT and AMS, the Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Metropolitan Solutions — seeks to design and test the world's first fleet of autonomous boats in the city of Amsterdam. Each water-based unit ( a ‘roboat’ ) can be used for transporting goods and people and for creating temporary floating infrastructures, such as self-assembling bridges and concert stages. Roboats can also monitor the city's waters using new environmental sensors that provide vital insights on urban and human health. 

Learn more about the project: http://senseable.mit.edu/roboat/

Role/Tasks: We are looking for 3-4 students with any of the following experience. We don’t expect you to have all these skills! This is just a guideline of what we’re looking for and the tasks you’ll be completing. Students of all majors encouraged to apply: EE, CS, ME, Architecture… 

Experience on programming in Arduino, STM32 or Raspberry Pi development environment

Experience with any or all of the following a plus:

  • Knowledge of how to design a prototype circuits
  • Writing classes in C++
  • Writing classes in Python
  • Knowledge of how to program in RTOS environment

Experience in robot control and navigation

Experience with any or all of the following a plus:

  • Knowledge of control theory, robot dynamics, convex optimization, model predictive control 
  • Knowledge of laser-based or camera-based localization or navigation
  • Writing classes in Matlab
  • Writing classes in C++
  • Writing classes in Python 

Design and fabrication experience

  • Knowledge of Rhino / Solidworks
  • Knowledge of Adobe Creative Suite
  • Experience laser cutting, 3D printing
  • Comfortable using shop tools

Contact: Wei Wang wweiwang@mit.edu; Luis Mateos lamateos@mit.edu; Fabio Duarte fduarte@mit.edu

 


4/11/17

Summer

Department/Lab/Center: Chemical Engineering (Course 10)

Faculty Supervisor: Michael Strano

Project Title: Biomolecular sensing based on single walled carbon nanotubes

Project Description: We are a group specialized in using the near IR fluorescence of carbon nanotubes to transduce signals for analyzing and detecting molecules of interest, especially for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. Different chemistry and mechanisms are employed for this purpose with a common ground that the fluorescence of carbon nanotubes are very sensitive to the environment.   We are looking for motivated undergraduate researchers. As long as you are interested, and want to learn about research and the science, you are encouraged to contact us. All majors are welcome. Prefer long term commitment. You will get in touch with both experimental and mathematical research tools and learn knowledge about surface chemistry, protein chemistry, nano material fabrication, fluorescence spectroscopy and so on. Please send a resume with the initial contact. Thank you.

Contact: Juyao (Ivy) Dong: juyao@mit.edu


4/11/17

Summer

Department/Lab/Center: Materials Science and Engineering (Course 3)

Faculty Supervisor: Rafael Jaramillo

Project Title: Developing new process for making large-area, ultra-thin semiconductors

Project Description: The aim of this project is to develop a process for making ultra-thin films of layered semiconductors. We will develop a sulfurization/selenization furnace in the Jaramillo lab, and use this furnace to process ultra-thin oxide films that are prepared by our industrial collaborators by atomic layer deposition (ALD). We will use a variety of characterization techniques to understand the materials synthesis process, and to connect synthesis to performance such as catalysis. This work will ultimately lead to a process to make ultra-thin, layered semiconductors entirely by ALD.  This project will be jointly advised by Prof. Jeff Grossman and Prof. Rafael Jaramillo.

UROP Tasks  You will finish building a sulfurization/selenization furnace, including automated control of gas delivery. You will then use this furnace to process samples that will be provided by our industrial partners, and to characterize the resulting films.   You will work together with a small team of two or more undergraduate researchers. You will work under the direction of a graduate student in the Jaramillo research group, and a research scientist in the Grossman research group.   

Prerequisites  You should be interested in semiconductor devices, inorganic chemistry, and thin film synthesis and characterization. You should enjoy careful, hands-on work. You should be prepared to handle toxic gases patiently and responsibly. Experience with materials synthesis and experiment design (including computer-instrument controls) are a plus, but are not required. 

URL:  http://jaramillo.mit.edu/

Contact: Rafael Jaramillo rjaramil@mit.edu


4/11/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Media Laboratory

Faculty Supervisor: Ramesh Raskar

Project Title: Machine Learning Applications On Food Supply Chain

Project Description: We will use computer vision and machine learning algorithms for analyzing large scale optical data of produce- fruits and vegetables. We will combine techniques such as neural networks and support vector machines with visible and near-infrared spectral data to identify type, quality and other attributes. We will use either tensorflow/caffe/theano for development and testing.

Prerequisites: Matlab skills required, python skills are a plus.

Contact: Otkrist Gupta: otkrist@mit.edu


4/11/17

Summer

Department/Lab/Center: Mechanical Engineering (Course 2)

Faculty Supervisor: Evelyn Wang

Project Title: MIT Lab Energy Assessment Center

Project Description: The Device Research Lab recently won a grant from the MIT Green Labs program to found the Lab Energy Assessment Center (LEAC) at MIT.  The LEAC will provide energy assessments free of charge to labs on campus with the goal of identifying ways that the labs can save energy and implement sustainable practices.  Each assessment will be conducted by a team of students who use a wireless energy monitoring network based on the Wemo family of devices.  This wireless network, to be purchased with the grant money and designed based on a prototype in room 7-021, will be installed in the lab being assessed for period of a few days to collect energy usage data.  Following the data collection as well as a lab inspection and discussion with lab users, the team of students assessing the lab will compile the data and inspection results in a comprehensive report that details power consumption patterns, recommends energy-saving and sustainable practices that could be implemented in the lab (for example, automatically turning off overhead lighting, changing freezer setpoints, adding a glove recycling program, etc.), and estimates the potential economic and environmental impact.

Prerequisites: We are interested in hiring an interdisciplinary group of students who either have a background in thermodynamics or energy analysis to analyze data and identify opportunities to save power or have experience in computer science and networking to operate and maintain the wireless sensor network during assessments and also develop new raspberry pi or jetson-based hardware for autonomous monitoring.  This UROP starts in summer 2017 (paid or credit, up to 40 hr/wk).  For pay, please respond to this listing ASAP and before the end of the day on April 12th in order to apply for funding.

URL: http://leac.mit.edu/

Contact: Please send a resume and brief statement of interest to Dan Preston (dpreston@mit.edu; web: http://drl.mit.edu), along with your availability to meet and discuss this opportunity to join the MIT LEAC.


4/11/17

Summer

Department/Lab/Center: Biological Engineering

Faculty Supervisor: Prof. Robert Langer

Project Title:  Large dose delivery of therapeutics

Project Description:  Here in Bob Langer's lab we have openings for talented undergrad Urops.   This project aims to develop novel devices for delivery of large doses of drugs for the treatment of tuberculosis, HIV, Malaria among other infectious diseases.  The Urop joining the lab will be trained in the begining to deliver tasks. The project can involve any of these skills: device fabrication and testing, cleanroom/microfabrication, in vitro device evaluation, mathematical modeling, and ultimately in vivo device evaluation in small and large animal models.  This is an amazing opportunity for a motivated student who likes to work in one of the most internationally well known and productive labs in the area of drug delivery and learn from multidisciplinary teams composed of chemists, chemical engineers and physicians.

At least 10 to 12 hours per week dedicated to project work for 2 semesters. sophomore, junior and senior students with Engineering/science background are welcome to apply.

Contact: Please send your resume/CV to Ali Beyzavi, beyzavi@mit.edu


4/11/17

Summer

Department/Lab/Center: Biological Engineering

Faculty Supervisor: Prof. Robert Langer

Project Title: Developing a smart biomedical device

Project Description:  This project aims to develop a novel Nasogastric tube for monitoring of the patients conditions (pH, heart rate, internal body temperature, etc)   The Urop joining the lab will be trained in the begining to deliver tasks. The project can involve any of these skills: MATLAB programming, signal processing, in vivo device evaluation in large animal models, device fabrication.  This is an amazing opportunity for a motivated student who likes to work in one of the most internationally well known and productive labs in the area of drug delivery and learn from multidisciplinary teams composed of chemists, chemical engineers and physicians.

At least 10 to 12 hours per week dedicated to project work for 2 semesters. sophormore, junior and senior students with Engineering/science background are welcome to apply.

Contact: Please send your resume/CV to Ali Beyzavi, beyzavi@mit.edu


4/11/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies (ISN)

Faculty Supervisor: Ivan Celanovic

Project Title: High efficiency thermoelectric generator for portable power

Project Description: We have an exciting opportunity to work on a small, portable thermoelectric (TE) generator, capable of converting fuel to electricity at the millimeter scale with no moving parts. Applications include soldier power, remote sensing, and drone and robot power. Our lab focuses on thermophotovoltaic (TPV) portable power generation which converts fuel to electricity using heat and light as intermediaries. Through collaborations, we recently acquired several state of the art thermoelectric modules and are seeking an independent and motivated student to explore their potential.

The student will work closely with a post doc but is expected to take ownership of the following tasks:

  1. Design and build an experimental apparatus for thermal and electrical characterization of TE devices.
  2. Fit a model to the measured data.
  3. Based on the developed TE model and existing microcombustor model, thermally "impedance match" the TE module and microcombustor.
  4. Experimentally integrate microcombustor with TE devices and measure fuel-to-electricity performance.

The student should be able to work full time over the summer, and ideally part time throughout the year. This project could be expanded to be an MEng thesis. Funding is available.

Requirements:

  • Experience with basic (6.002 level) circuits
  • Experience with CAD and mechanical design
  • Machine shop training and access
  • Experience with SciPy, Matlab, or similar for data analysis
  • Interest in portable power, heat to electricity conversion, combustion-driven systems, or similar

Contact: Walker Chan: wrchan@mit.edu


4/11/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Chemical Engineering (Course 10)

Faculty Supervisor: Klavs F. Jensen

Project Title: Homogeneous Addition via a Continuous Flow Membrane Reactor

Project Description: Continuous production has emerged as a promising alternative to batch production in the pharmaceutical industry. Developing reactors with specific functions will help continuous production gain more popularity. One operating mode in batch is drop-wise addition, which can avoid side reactions and increase heat dissipation. However, this operation mode is challenging in a continuous setup. Recently, we developed an innovative homogenous addition reactor that utilizes a nanofiltration membrane to slowly deliver a reactant to a reagent stream in flow. Accurately controlling the pressure inside the reactor allows for a nearly uniform flow distribution. UROPs in this project will employ this reactor to test several organic chemistry reactions to fully characterize the performance of the design. Possible reactions include macro lactonization, diazo compounds, and highly exothermic reactions. In addition, reactor design optimization will be needed based on the properties of the chemistry being tested. In this project, UROPs will gain experience towards the skill set that is required for chemical engineers, including characterizing and optimizing reactors, conducting organic chemistry reactions in a continuous flow mode, measuring conversion and yield (IR, HPLC, and GC), and integrating chemical systems with LabVIEW.

Prerequisites: UROPs (course 10) with solid background in heat and mass transfer, reactor design, and organic chemistry are welcome to apply for this position. Highly motivated UROPs with limited experience for some of these requirements are also welcome to apply if they have extensive experimental experience.

Contact: Yiming Mo: yimingmo@mit.edu


4/11/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Materials Science and Engineering (Course 3)

Faculty Supervisor: Cem Tasan

Project Title: In-situ deformation of sheet metal in complex strain path

Project Description: Metal shaping operations that are commonly used by automotive, aerospace and packaging industries, subject metals to complex strain paths during deformation. For example, a given sheet metal might deform in uniaxial tension and then in biaxial tension, within a single pressing operation! Novel nanostructured alloys for these industries are not specifically designed considering these complexities. In this project, we will carry out "quasi-in-situ" deformation experiments using an home-builtbulge testing setup to understand the atomic mechanisms of plasticity and damage in these materials.

Prerequisites: Interest in metals, mechanics, microstructures...

Contact: Cem Tasan: tasan@mit.edu


4/11/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Materials Science and Engineering (Course 3)

Faculty Supervisor: Prof. Julia Ortony

Project Title: Investigating ion condensation at supramolecular interfaces

Project Description: Molecules can be designed so that upon exposure to water, they self-assemble into nanoscale objects of a variety of geometries (including ribbons, fibers, spheres, and beyond). Generally, the molecules that compose these beautiful and tiny nanostructures are charged, and the behavior of the counterions surrounding the self-assembled nanostructure is an important consideration for energy sustainability, environmental, and biomedical applications. So far, measuring the motion and position of these ions has been experimentally challenging. This UROP project will involve the development and implementation of a novel NMR-based technique to access this important information. The project will be carried out in close collaboration with a senior scientist who specializes in magnetic resonance methodology. The student will be fully integrated into our research group which synthesizes and studies physical and chemical aspects of molecular self-assembly.

Prerequisites: Applicants must have completed their Freshman and Sophomore years of study(and preferably their junior year too). Materials science, chemistry, orphysics majors would be best suited for this position.  Knowledge of physical and organic chemistry is required.

Contact: Julia Ortony: ortony@mit.edu


4/11/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Mechanical Engineering (Course 2)

Faculty Supervisor: A. John Hart

Project Title: Four-Dimensional Patterning

Project Description: The objective of this project is to test the ability to use ultrasound to pattern materials to create three-dimensional structures that can be reformed over time (similar to acoustic levitation). The UROP would be involved in modifying an electronic setup and running hands-on experiments to characterize the kinds of structures that can be formed.

Prerequisites: Experience with one or more of of hands-on experimentation, fluids, wave propagation, fundamentals of manufacturing, or electrical engineering would be useful, but not required.

Contact: Please send a resume to Crystal Owens: crystalo@mit.edu by April 12.


4/11/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Mechanical Engineering (Course 2)

Faculty Supervisor: A. John Hart

Project Title: Open-Air Lego(R) Microfluidic Device Design

Project Description: The objective of this project is to design, build, and understand a set of Lego-like microfluidic components that interact via capillary forces. The UROP will be involved in manufacturing components, characterizing function, and possibly developing new designs. This would be good experience for students interested in both product design and fluid mechanics. 

Prerequisites: Please only apply if you have taken a course in fluid mechanics. Experience with hands-on labwork would be useful but is not required. It would be helpful to have a background in fluid mechanics (especially interfaces and wetting), and fabrication (especially milling andPDMS casting).

Contact: Please send a resume to Crystal Owens: crystalo@mit.edu by April 12.


4/11/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Media Laboratory

Faculty Supervisor: Ramesh Raskar

Project Title: Low-cost Medical Imaging Devices

Project Description: Today, an X-ray machine can cost thousands of dollars. In resource-poor areas of the world, at-risk populations will not have access to an X-ray machine, causing millions of cases of pneumonia and TB to go undiagnosed.

In this project, a low-cost X-ray scanner will be developed by repurposing consumer electronic hardware (printers and scanners). If successfully developed over the summer, the student will have the opportunity to (a) publish the work; and (b) potential travel opportunities to deploy the invention in the developing world (e.g., a village in India).  This project is in collaboration with the AXIS center at Harvard Medical School.

Prerequisites: This is a hacker project, so requires passion above all else.

Helpful Skills:

  • Optics
  • Nuclear engineering

Contact: Achuta Kadambi: achoo@mit.edu

 


4/11/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Media Laboratory

Faculty Supervisor: Ramesh Raskar

Project Title: VR/AR project at the Media Lab

Project Description: A hot topic in VR/AR is in photorealistic capture and digitization of our visual world. In this project, an "environment map" of the physical light field will be captured using moving cameras and post-processing algorithms.The end goal is to re-render a perfect visual copy of the physical world, especially in context of the lighting. If successful, this project takes steps toward VR and AR systems that more seamlessly blend the physical world with the digital world. The ideal project outcome is a paper at one of the top conferences, e.g., SIGGRAPH/CVPR/ISMAR/etc.

Required Skills:

  • MATLAB
  • Interest in computer vision and computer graphics
  • A summer commitment

Helpful Skills:

  • Experience with machine learning
  • Experience with robotics/SLAM

Contact: Achuta Kadambi: achoo@mit.edu


4/6/17

Summer

Department/Lab/Center: Mechanical Engineering (Course 2)

Faculty Supervisor: Sangbae Kim

Project Title: Force Sensing Smart Shoes for Humans and Robots

Project Description: We are developing the next generation of the wearables in the form of shoes that are capable of real-time in-situ measurement of multi-axis force data. This work will involve integrating the lightweight force sensor that have been developed for use on the MIT Cheetah robot. 

The force sensor is capable of:  

1. Measuring large forces in both the normal and shear directions. 

2. Real-time in-situ data streaming (1kHz) using an onboard ARM microcontroller for data processing, and a WiFi chip for data streaming. 

3. High impact robustness, and immunity to inertial noise during large accelerations.  

The ultimate goal is to use these force sensing shoes to help: 

1. Elderly to detect neurologic gait abnormalities, and facilitate earlier treatment. 

2. Disabled people for fall prevention and mitigation, when moving about with prosthetics or exoskeletons. 

3. Athletes to collect data during trainings to better optimize their workouts.  

We are looking for a few motivated undergraduate students (Course 2 or 6) to work on this project in the Biomimetic Robotics Lab (biomimetics.mit.edu), under the supervision of Michael Chuah (PhD candidate) and Prof. Sangbae Kim. These positions are for either direct funding or credit. 

Possible UROP projects include: 

1. Improvements to the CAD as well as molding and fabrication methods of the footpad sensors and current shoe prototype. 

2. Abaqus simulation of the footpad. Material testing to determine the most appropriate material model. 

3. Determining contact position and angle with the footpad. 

4. Wireless communication between footpad sensor and computer/smartphone through WiFi. 

5. Improvements to the electronics, i.e. making the PCB design modular, wireless charging of the next shoe prototype. 

6. Miniaturization of the footpad sensor for shear sensing in the fingers of a robotic hand or on a spacesuit glove 

7. Exploration of new piezoresistive materials for sensing.

Nice-to-haves:  Please highlight experience with ANY of the following such as:

  • Mechanical design experience (Solidworks)
  • Manufacturing/machining: laser cutting, 3d printing, polymer molding, CNC machining (G-code)
  • Simulation: FEA simulations (Abacus)
  • Programming: MATLAB, LabVIEW, Android (Java), C/C++
  • Electronics: microcontroller (Arduino, mbed)
  • PCB circuit design (Eagle, KiCad, DesignSpark)
  • Wireless communications (WiFi, ESP8266).   

URL: http://biomimetics.mit.edu/footpad-sensor

Contact: If you are interested in being part of this project, please contact Michael Chuah (mcx@mit.edu) with your resume. Be sure to highlight any relevant experience, the project that most interest you, and any other questions you may have. 


4/6/17

Summer

Department/Lab/Center: Urban Studies and Planning (Course 11)

Faculty Supervisor: Carlo Ratti

Project Title: Treepedia

Project Description: We've developed a metric - the Green View Index - by which to evaluate and compare canopy cover in cities around the world. In collaboration with the World Economic Forum, we're growing this database to span the globe. To do this, we need your help! Come work on an exciting project that's getting a lot of media attention (just Google Treepedia!). With your help, we want to scale to build a global platform mapping the urban canopy.

Prerequisites: Looking for 1-2 student(s) in computer science or urban studies and planning (or relevant field), proficient in GIS and python. An interest in urban ecology is a plus.

URL: senseable.mit.edu/treepedia

Contact Name: Newsha Ghaeli

Contact Email: ghaeli@mit.edu


4/6/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center: Mechanical Engineering (Course 2)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Irmgard Bischofberger 

Project Title: Landslides in the lab

Trapped beneath a landslide caused by intense rainfall in the mountains, a scientist is consumed by one question: what triggered this landslide? It has been observed that landslides often coincide with the formation of spatially uneven wetting patterns, where the infiltrating water forms preferential flow pathways through the soil. This formation of wet fingers coexisting with dryer zones is the primary cause of often catastrophic erosion. However, largely due to the diversity of soil compositions that occurs in natural soils, the physical processes underlying this relation between the fingered flow and the soil failure are still unknown. In this experimental project, we will build a model soil composed of sand grains and induce water infiltration with controlled topologies. This will allow us to address the role of friction between wet/dry interfaces and to establish the failure modes in the system by visualizing the location where sliding of the material first occurs.

Irmgard Bischofberger 

irmgard@mit.edu


4/6/17

Summer

Department/Lab/Center: Health Sciences and Technology (HST)

Faculty Supervisor: Jonathan Polimeni, PhD

Project Title: 3D Brain Surface Modeling Software for Neuroimaging Data Analysis

Project Description: Our neuroimaging laboratory is looking for a student with experience in computer science and an interest in neuroscience to port software for 3D brain surface mesh creation, manipulation, and visualization from MATLAB to C/C++. The student will have access to neuroscientists and software developers who are familiar with the detailed goals of the project. The software created during this project will be used by our lab to guide neuroimaging experiments and analyze the resulting imaging data. Although flexible, we would ideally start this project as soon as possible (Spring or Summer 2017, with the opportunity to continue if interested).

Time Commitment: 8 hours per week.

Prerequisites: Knowledge of MATLAB and C/C++ programming is required. A background in software development and computational geometry are highly desired.

Contact Name: Ned Ohringer

Contact Email: Ned.Ohringer@MGH.HARVARD.EDU


4/5/17

Summer

Department/Lab/Center: Sloan School of Management (Course 15)

Faculty Supervisor: Prof. Christian Catalini

Project Title: Using Machine Learning and Big Data to Predict Startup Success

Project Description: The objective of this project is to develop new code and tools to predict startup growth.   Please only apply if you have strong programming skills in machine learning and python. Some libraries we use in our work include sklearn, tensorflow, and Keras. Knowledge of SQL and basic statistics are a plus.  Students will have access to a unique, large-scale dataset of startup founding and growth events. They will also learn about the economics of early-stage entrepreneurship and startup fundraising (equity crowdfunding, angel financing, venture capital).  If you are interested in getting hands-on experience in machine learning, economics research and data analysis as well as to understand the dynamics of startup success, this would be a great learning opportunity.  

Prerequisites: Please only apply if you have strong programming skills in machine learning and python.  Please include your availability to meet and past experience with machine learning and python projects.

URL: crowdfunding.mit.edu

Contact Name: Prof. Christian Catalini

Contact Email: catalini@mit.edu


4/5/17

Summer

Department/Lab/Center: Urban Studies and Planning (Course 11)

Faculty Supervisor: Carlo Ratti

Project Name: Crowdsourcing Bridge Vibration Measurements with Mobile Smartphones

Project Description: This project studies the feasibility of using crowdsourced smartphone data to monitor bridge vibrations and streamline maintenance protocols using real data, collected in the field. Mandatory bridge inspections are infrequent and rely on visual inspections, yet US bridges are in a state of widespread disrepair. The research field of Structural Health Monitoring aims to determine structural properties through the analysis of vibration data, collected by a distributed sensor network, e.g., wireless accelerometers, and can help diagnose structural damage promptly. Over the past two decades, these techniques have relied on specified sensing technology, which are expensive and not scalable - thus, have a limited public service. Mobile sensor networks offer a unique opportunity to measure bridge vibrations with a high spatial resolution and using fewer sensors. Recent studies have shown that the accelerometers present in smartphones are capable of capturing the true dynamic properties of a structural system, e.g., the fundamental frequency of a bridge. Researchers at the lab are implementing a novel algorithm (currently coded in Matlab) called STRIDE, which is capable of determining structural modal properties from mobile sensor network data.

Role/tasks: 

  • Assist with the development of a smartphone app for user data collection 
  • Work on a team to define preprocessing steps necessary to accommodate heterogeneous big data streams from smartphones 
  • Help design and develop automated and computationally scalable processing frameworks that incorporate existing Matlab scripts 
  • Occasionally interact with app users, MassDOT, the City of Boston, and other interested parties

Contact: Thomas Matarazzo / tomjmat@mit.edu


4/5/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center Health Sciences and Technology (HST)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name Seok-Hyun Yun 

A hand-held, fiber optic probe for biomechanical measurements of the eye 

(HST, Course 6, Course 8, Course 2, Course 20).  We are developing a new biomedical imaging tool based on Brillouin light scattering for non-invasively measuring the biomechanical properties of tissues. An important application of this optical technique is measuring the biomechanics of tissues in the eye (such as the cornea and sclera) in order to improve diagnosis and screening for diseases related to mechanical weakening. We are looking for a UROP to develop a hand-held, optical fiber-based probe to be used in a clinical setting for biomechanical measurements on the eye. The probe will focus laser light onto the eye at variable depth, and then collect the resulting Brillouin scattered light via an integrated optical fiber for spectral analysis. The UROP will have the opportunity to design and prototype a biomedical device and will potentially be able to see their work used with patients.

No biomedical background is necessary. Experience working with optics, lasers and fibers is a big plus, as is mechanical design/prototyping experience. Attention to detail, creativity, and comfort with independent work are important.  Majors in Course 6, 8, 2, 20 (or equivalent experience) are preferred.

http://www.intelon.org/index_files/Page436.htm 

Contact Name Dr. Amira Elton

Contact Email: aeltony@mgh.harvard.edu


4/5/17

Summer

UROP Department, Lab or Center Health Sciences and Technology (HST)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name Seok-Hyun Yun

Project Title: Mapping biomechanical properties of the cornea 

Project Description  (HST, Course 6, Course 8, Course 20, Course 2): We are developing a new biomedical imaging tool based on Brillouin light scattering for non-invasively measuring the biomechanical properties of the eye. An important application of this optical technique is measuring the biomechanics of the cornea (the clear, outer layer of the eye responsible for much of the eye’s focusing power) in order to improve diagnosis and screening for diseases related to corneal mechanical weakening. We are looking for a UROP to develop the capabilities of the instrument for creating accurate, spatially resolved maps of the cornea. This will involve using structured light illumination and a camera to determine the surface profile of the cornea in real time, so that Brillouin measurements can be built up to create a 3D stiffness map of a patient’s cornea. The UROP will make an important contribution to the development of a biomedical device and will have the opportunity to see their work used with patients.

Some programming experience is required. Experience in image processing is a plus. No biomedical background is necessary. Attention to detail, creativity, and comfort with independent work are also important. Majors in Course 6, 8, 20, 2 (or equivalent experience) are preferred.


4/3/17

Summer

Department/Lab/Center: Aeronautics and Astronautics (Course 16)

Faculty Supervisor: Julie Shah

Project Title: Experiments in manipulation planning for automated wiring harness installation.

Project Description: The current manufacturing processes in automotive and aerospace final assembly require manual installation of electrical wiring harnesses in the fuselage/chassis. These processes are prone to errors in cable placement which require a long time to rectify, as it involves detaching and moving a very large portion of the cable. In prior work we have developed algorithms to assist in planning the assembly steps for robotic installation of the wiring harness that would ensure a lower error rate. We are now looking for assistance in running simulation and physical experiments to evaluate the effectiveness of the planning algorithm in real world scenarios. This position provides a great opportunity for the student to learn about considerations while deploying a robotic technology in the real world. It also offers insights into design of planning algorithms for manufacturing tasks and some unique challenges it presents. Finally it also offers a chance to work with a robotic platform to translate the algorithm from simulation domain to the physical world.

Timeline: We are looking for a candidate to work full time during the summer. However as we would be working towards an end of Summer deadline, it would be beneficial to start familiarization with the planner and environment in late spring.

Requirements: Experience in software engineering, Linear algebra.

Optional but helpful: Specifc experience with MATLAB, python and ROS.

Contact Name: Ankit Shah

Contact Email: ajshah@mit.edu


4/3/17

Summer

Department/Lab/Center: Chemical Engineering (Course 10)

Faculty Supervisor: Prof. John Lienhard

Project Title: Energy Efficient Resource Recovery from Water (waste) Streams: Experimental Design, Set-up, lab work, and Proof-Of-Concept Studies

Project Description: We are looking for UROP student(s) interested in renewable technology who like building things to assist in experiment design/assembly and running experiments to build a water treatment research benchtop system. The work may also include journal paper diagrams and text, technical reports, graphing and analysis, patent diagrams, and other work for journal papers. $11.50/hour, and credit is also an option. Ideally a student would start soon, with a more significant time commitment this summer.

The Project: The research project is on experimentally realizing recovery of NaOH from synthetic reverse osmosis brine. This compound is added to remove unsafe compounds, especially boron, that can get through the membranes. This recovery is done via the Chlor-alkali process, which involves a voltage applied to electrodes, which cause the movement of Na+ and Cl- ions and the production of H2 and OH- via electrolysis.

The students will help design and build a setup consisting of piping, electrodes for electrolysis, a membrane, and various sensors. The research aims to reduce the costs and membrane fouling challenges for the leading desalination technology: reverse osmosis. The technology is critical for providing increased water resources and remediating waterborne disease in India and elsewhere.

Our adviser, Professor Lienhard, is Director for JWAFS, and The Center for Clean Water and Clean Energy and former Associate Department Head for mechanical engineering. The research group is located in building 7 in the Rohsenow Kendall Heat Transfer Laboratory, a lab that originated in 1870 and has a prestigious history. The student will work closely under the mentorship of PostDocs. Acknowledgement on multiple papers is very likely, and coauthorship is possible. Productive students who stay for multiple time periods (e.g. fall and spring) will have the opportunity to be a coauthor on conference and/or journal papers.

Prerequisites: We re looking for enthusiastic and committed students who like building things to help with a wide variety of activities. Experience in building things, machining, performing experiments, and/or hands on work may be helpful. Chemistry coursework is a plus. We do hire exceptional underclassman too.

URL: http://lienhard.scripts.mit.edu/research/

Contact Name: Amit Kumar

Contact Email: amitkum@mit.edu


4/3/17

Summer

Department/Lab/Center: Mechanical Engineering (Course 2)

Faculty Supervisor: Klavs Jensen

Project Title: Design and Assembly of a Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Platforms

Project Description: We are currently working on designing and assembling a cGMP pharmaceutical manufacturing machine to produce antibiotics. This is a great opportunity to work with industrial partners to see your designs be utilized in the real work. The components that are being developed are for small and medium scale advanced liquid handling components to be used in aggressive environments and demanding conditions required for pharmaceutical manufacturing. The components are being built in the context of the demonstration of a new automated, state of the art chemical synthesis platforms. The candidate will be involved in the design, assembly, and testing of new parts and components

Main tasks will involve:

  • Identification of key design parameters and parts specification
  • 3D modeling (with Solidworks) of parts to be built (production is typically outsourced)
  • Assembly and testing of parts and components.
  • Documenting design work and results.

The candidate will be carefully supervised in his work to simplify navigating through a multidisciplinary project, ensure efficiency, meeting of deadlines thus providing a steep learning opportunity. This opening provides course 2 students with a stimulating hands on experience were their design skills can be put to fruit in a practical context.

Prerequisites:

  • Original thinking and motivation!!
  • General knowledge of mechanical design and fabrication methods.
  • Working knowledge of SolidWorks.
  • Machine shop experience.
  • The hands on nature of the position requires the successful candidate to be comfortable in shop work.

URL: http://web.mit.edu/jensenlab/research/chemistry/

Contact Name: Dale Thomas

Contact Email: dt3@mit.edu


4/3/17

Department/Lab/Center: Physics (Course 8)

Faculty Supervisor: Max Tegmark

Project Title: The Physics of Intelligence

Project Description: How does your brain work? Can we use recent breakthroughs from artificial intelligence to understand your mind better, or vice versa? In this project, we tackle such big questions with calculations, simulations and state-of-the-art neuroscience data from MIT and Harvard. You don't need to have a background in neuroscience or AI to work with me as long as you're eager to learn and share my interests: You love big questions such as how the brain processes information and why some but not all quark blobs are conscious. You're interested in learning and using advanced tools from condensed matter physics, field theory and information theory. You enjoy working with computers and state-of-the-art data to put theories to the test. You're interested in learning how to create your own deep neural networks. You can watch this video without falling asleep: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GzCvlFRISIM

Prerequisites: Programming experience

URL: http://space.mit.edu/home/tegmark/technical.html

Contact Name: Max Tegmark

Contact Email: tegmark@mit.edu


4/3/17

Summer

Department/Lab/Center: Media Laboratory

Faculty Supervisor: Rosalind Picard

Project Title: Developing Smart Toys and Tools for Children with Autism and Other Special Needs

Project Description: We are developing custom-built hardware and software platforms designed to study cognition, regulation, and engagement for children -- especially those with complex neurological needs like autism -- through highly-motivating, self-driven play environments. The quantitative data and developmental trajectories captured by this platform will enable systematic, long-term studies of different therapeutic and educational approaches to neurodevelopmental disorders with the goal of fostering the cognitive potential of every learner.

We are seeking motivated UROPs with experience in one or several of the following areas:

  • Mechanical design and engineering
  • Principles of game design (e.g., how to match challenge and reward for motivated, engaging play)
  • Hardware development (Arduino/microcontrollers, interactive sensors, etc.)
  • Solid works
  • CNC milling
  • 3D printing
  • Familiarity with young children, autism, or other special needs appreciated but not required.

You should state your background/experience, major, class year, and why you are interested in the project in the response. In return, we promise that the work you do will be both rewarding and fun!

Contact Name: Kristy Johnson

Contact Email: ktj@media.mit.edu


4/3/17

Summer

Department/Lab/Center: Mathematics (Course 18)

Faculty Supervisor: Prof. Alan Edelman

Project description: Spreadsheets are used by nearly 100M people every day. Triple store databases (e.g., Google Big Table, Amazon Dynamo, and Hadoop HBase) store a large fraction of the analyzed data in the world and are the backbone of modern web companies. Both spreadsheets and big tables can hold diverse data (e.g., strings, dates, integers, and reals) and lend themselves to diverse representations (e.g., matrices, functions, hash tables, and databases). D4M (Dynamic Distributed Dimensional Data Model) has been developed to provide a mathematically rich interface to triple stores. The spreadsheets, triple stores, sparse linear algebra, and fuzzy algebra. This projects seeks to strengthen the abstract algebraic foundations of associative arrays. The student will work with the faculty advisor to develop the basic theorems of associative arrays by building on existing work on fuzzy algebra and linear algebra. Participants will be paid.

Website: www.mit.edu/~kepner/

Qualifications: Strong mathematical background (the student should have completed 18.701 and 18.702). Experience with Matlab is helpful, but not a requirement.

Contact: Dr. Jeremy Kepner, kepner@ll.mit.edu


3/29/17

Summer

Nuclear Reactor Laboratory (NRL)

Faculty Supervisor: David Moncton

Project Title: Experimenting with the Neutron Diffractometer at the MIT Nuclear Reactor Lab

Project Description: Neutron scattering is a powerful set of techniques for studying the structure and dynamics of matter. One of the most basic neutron-scattering instruments is a triple-axis diffractometer, which is used to study crystal structures. MIT Nuclear Reactor Lab (NRL) has such diffractometer, which is currently being upgraded and calibrated. Once operational, this instrument will be used, for example, for examination of specimens irradiated at NRL. The student will have to become familiar with the theory and day-to-day operations of the diffractometer and conduct early experiments.

Prerequisites: Basic solid-state physics, basic quantum mechanics or neutron physics, ability to code in Python or Matlab.

Contact Name: Boris Khaykovich

Contact Email: bkh@mit.edu


3/29/17

Summer

Nuclear Reactor Laboratory (NRL)

Faculty Supervisor: David Moncton

Project Title: Designing optics for a novel x-ray source

Project Description: X-rays provide the most useful methods of studying the structure and dynamics of matter. At the MIT Nuclear Reactor, we are developing a constructing a novel x-ray source, which will be much more powerful than available commercial sources. The UROP student will take part in designing x-ray optics for this instrument. The work includes conducting computer ray-tracing simulations and analyzing results. The project is suitable for students interested in physics, optics, nuclear or materials science, or computational methods.

Prerequisites: Good programming skills and an interest in code writing are essential, including very good familiarity with Python or Matlab.

Contact Name: Boris Khaykovich

Contact Email: bkh@mit.edu


3/29/17

Summer

Department/Lab/Center: Health Sciences and Technology (HST)

Faculty Supervisor: Elazer Edelman

Project Title: Build control system for a custom mechanical rig for testing bioresorbable scaffolds

Project Description: Cardiovascular stents are implanted in millions of patients each year. The most advanced technology utilizing bioresorbable to eliminate long term concerns associated with metal stents. However, it leads to a higher rate of clinical failures. Our work seeks to understand the dynamic behavior of these devices to provide insights for future device development. There is an opening for an undergraduate interested in control systems, system level circuit building, programming and image acquisition and processing. The control system will direct function of a mechanical strength testing configuration. The project will involve hands-on experimentation and assembly of trial designs both mechanical and electrical.

Prerequisites: System design, programming (C#) and circuit building experience are preferred. Ability to read electrical drawings and good documentation skills are also preferred. Candidates must be reliable, organized, and independent with strong communication skills. Please send a pdf of your CV.

Contact Name: Peijiang Wang

Contact Email: wpj@mit.edu


3/29/17

Summer

Department/Lab/Center: Biology (Course 7)

Faculty Supervisor: Graham Walker

Project Title: Discover bacterial proteins that are important for persistent bacterial infections

Project Description: In the Walker lab, we study the nitrogen fixing symbiosis of the soil bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti and legumes of the Medicago plant species that is of great agricultural and economic importance. Because the bacteria invade and live inside of plant cells during the symbiosis this system can also be exploited as a model system to understand chronic, pathogenic bacterial infections, such as tuberculosis or brucellosis. The outcomes from these studies will deepen our understanding of essential bacterial factors important for the legume symbiosis and, secondly, translate to chronic pathogenic bacteria-host interactions on the molecular and biochemical level. This project aims to characterize bacterial proteins that are important for persistent bacterial infections and that are critical to modulate the antimicrobial effects of defensin-like cationic host peptides. You will learn a range of methodologies ranging from basic genetic techniques and bacterial physiology assays to cutting edge CRISPRi gene knockdown approaches.

Prerequisites: Prior experience in molecular biology or microbiology is of advantage but not required.

Contact Name: Markus Arnold

Contact Email: marnold@mit.edu


3/29/17

Summer

Department/Lab/Center: Health Sciences and Technology (HST)

Faculty Supervisor: Rakesh Jain

Project Title: Tumor microenvironment and cancer immunology

Project Description: Dr. Rakesh Jain’s lab at the Steele Lab for Tumor Biology at MGH is investigating how the tumor microenvironment affects cancer therapy response and resistance. This project will investigate how physical mechanical properties of the tumor microenvironment affects breast cancer growth and treatment response. Interdisciplinary approaches, such as confocal and intravital multi-photon microscopy, 2D and 3D culture models, microfluidic devices, flow cytometry, histology, molecular biology techniques and mouse models, will be used. Students will gain first hand research experience in breast cancer biology, tumor immunology and cell mechanics. Students are expected to be a part of our research laboratory full time over the summer, with the potential to stay over subsequent semesters for term-time research.

URL: https://steelelabs.mgh.harvard.edu/

Contact Name: Rosa Ng

Contact Email: rosang@steele.mgh.harvard.edu


3/27/2017

Summer 2017 UROP Showcase info session

Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL)

You’re invited to the CSAIL Summer 2017 UROP Showcase info session! This is a chance to hear a few projects in the lab needing UROPs, some administrative details, and a chance to ask questions! First year UROPs and anyone that hasn’t done Summer term should definitely come! Snacks will be provided



When: April, 6th 2017, 12:30-1:45 PM

Where: MIT Stata Center, 32-G449 (Patil Seminar Room)

Contact: Kyle Bettencourt, kyleb@mit.edu


3/27/2017

Term: Summer

Department/Lab/Center: Mechanical Engineering (Course 2)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Klavs Jensen

MIT Faculty Supervisor Email: Kfjensen@mit.edu

Project Title: Collaborative flow chemical synthesis robot

Project Description: (Mechanical, Course 2, Course 6, Course 10, Course 20, etc) We are developing a robotically reconfigurable chemical synthesizer utilizing microfluidics. The two unique capabilities are decentralized reaction modules for chemical synthesis monitoring and a novel fluidic manifold / reactor interface for robotic manipulation. This work is being carried out by a cross-disciplinary team ( mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, chemical engineering) focused on overcoming limitations of chemical synthesis through the design of reactor modules which have integrated control electronics and process analysis technology to collect data and optimize reactions. UROPs will be involved with the design and testing of new parts, electronic circuits, and components. We are also working on developing a new user interface for path planning and optimization reactor stacking. Tasks Include: Prototyping circuits for controlling process parameters (Arduino, PSoC) !

o Utilization of Bluetooth low energy o Control through PID o Othermill PCB boards Developing control interface for collaborative robot (UR3) in LabVIEW, Matlab, or Python Design and testing of new reactor designs The output of this projects is a robot that can make any pharmaceuticals on-demand.

Prerequisites: The major requirements are motivation and an eye the detail. Knowledge of (or interest in) programming an Arduino/PSoC, experience with LabVIEW/Matlab/Python for UI development, mechanical component design experience would also be helpful (solidworks, 3dp).

URL (if applicable): http://web.mit.edu/jensenlab/research/chemistry/

Contact Name: Dale Thomas

Contact Email: dt3@mit.edu


3/27/2017

Term: Summer

Department/Lab/Center: Brain and Cognitive Sciences (Course 9)

MIT Faculty Supervisor Name: Josh H. McDermott

MIT Faculty Supervisor Email: jhm@mit.edu

Project Title: Perceptual compression of uninformative stimuli in the human auditory system

Project Description: Our work explores the hypothesis that the goal of the auditory system is to maximize information about the environment while minimizing energy expenditure. Initial evidence suggests that human listeners compress sounds originating from predictable sources and retain unexpected sounds with high accuracy. This project combines psychophysics and natural sound statistics. The tasks include running perceptual experiments, collecting recordings of natural auditory scenes and data analysis.

Prerequisites: Basic knowledge of data analysis / statistics and programming (preferably in Matlab) is a plus.

URL (if applicable): mcdermottlab.mit.edu

Contact Name: Wiktor Mlynarski

Contact Email: mlynar@mit.edu


3/23/17

Summer 2017

Multiple Openings

Department/Lab/Center: Health Sciences and Technology (HST)

Faculty Supervisor: Jose Gomez-Marquez

Project Overview: The Little Devices lab of researchers turns toys into medical devices for international and domestic healthcare systems using design strategies such as affordability, modularity and DIY. Our lab aims to design technology that is robust and economical, yet intelligent using advanced sensors and smart materials. Projects from the group have been launched in Germany, Ecuador, Nicaragua, Ethiopia and New Zealand. The work has been featured by the New York Times, Wired, CNN, and TED.

UROP positions for Summer 2017 are listed below. We will give you important challenges, guidance and autonomy and resources to surprise us with smart solutions. All positions have the option for pay or credit. There is a 2-day fabrication and design orientation to be scheduled upon assigment. You will be joining a fast paced, interdisciplinary group who focuses on hands-on ideation and prototyping.

Project #1: Tinkering with Chemistry

Description: Work at the intersection of materials science and chemical engineering on next generation therapy technologies. Build upon our work in MIT’s multiplexed zika and ebola diagnostics, portable sensing, and environmental testing using microfluidics. Contribute to our Open Diagnostic Initiative to enable anyone in the world to create rapid diagnostics for infectious diseases using lab-developed construction sets for dengue, zika, and other viruses. You will work on inventing new types of instruments and biosensors using ligand interactions and some clinical chemistry.

Prerequisites: Strong understanding of organic chemistry and biochemistry. Wet lab experience a plus. You will learn any digital fabrication skills required for the projects such as laser cutting, 3-D printing and robot programming.

___________



Project #2: Programming and Building Hardware: Biosensors for Digital Health Divides (Course 2, 6, 20, 4)

Description: Design and test a suite of biosensors for physiological and biological parameters. Successful designs will plug and play with the rest of our prototyping platform and will be easily embeddable into unconventional diagnostic systems.

Prerequisites: Experience with designing, prototyping (such as Arduino) testing and debugging electronic circuits (e.g. embedded systems combining analog circuitry, digital circuitry, microcontrollers and wireless communications). Experience with wireless sensors or protocols helpful (e.g. Bluetooth, WiFi)

___________



Project #3: Digital Fabrication, Design and Healthcare Robotics (Mechanical, Course 2, Course 10, Course 20, etc)

Description: Invent new ways of using mechatronic and robotic systems make medical devices using digital fabrication tools. Create modular components for users to remix and customize these medical devices. Final output will use robots for affordable health applications.

Prerequisites: Experience with Solidworks or other 3D modeling software, fabrication experience (machine tools, waterjet, laser-cutter) and basic robotic (paths, manipulation, transport).

___________



Project #4: Manufacting Plug and Play Diagnostics (Mechanical, Course 2, Course 10, Course 20, etc)

Description: Assist with the design and manufacturing of a modular point-of-care diagnostic system. The objective of the UROP project would be to manufacture the diagnostics through design and fabrication of molds and optimize the injection molding methods. Further opportunities for design and prototyping of medical devices and diagnostics are also available.

Prerequisites: 2.008 and/or experience with injection molding and CNC machining strongly recommended, but not required.

___________

Project #5: Science Policy UROP: Exploring the Science and Policies of DIY Medical Technologies:

Description: Work closely with DIY medical device developers and assist in exploring the legal, ethical, and sociotechnical drivers that affect the development of informal medical device development. You will be part of a team analyzing and uncovering information from the MakerNurse project, our network of medical makerspaces, the Fair Trade medtech initiative, and the Open Diagnostics Project.

Contribute to our understanding of how underground networks of creators are changing medicine and biotech and learn about the tools that make it happen. We will measure disparities in access to life saving medical devices and the create scenarios involving real world tools developed in ours labs that can address them.

Prerequisites: An interest in medical device, maker culture, and democratized fabrication. Experience in literature reviews, data gathering and analysis, and an writing ideal.

Contact: Please send your CV and statement of interest to littledevices@mit.edu


3/23/17

Summer

Department/Lab/Center: Physics (Course 8)

Faculty Supervisor: Marin Soljacic

Project Title: Free electron radiation on Dirac cones in photonic crystals

Project Description: Dirac cones have become an important concept in many areas of condensed matter physics, such as graphene and topological insulators. In bosonic systems, our group have recently [1] shown how Non-hermitricity distorts a Dirac cone into a ring of exceptional points. For the summer and beyond, the UROP student that will be accepted to work with us will learn concepts of light-matter interaction, use the state-of-the-art electromagnetic simulation tools, and study how Dirac-like photonic bands tailor and enhance the radiation of free electrons, which could potentially give rise to ultra-strong short optical pulses.

[1] Zhen, Bo, Chia Wei Hsu, Yuichi Igarashi, Ling Lu, Ido Kaminer, Adi Pick, Song-Liang Chua, John D. Joannopoulos, and Marin Soljacic . "Spawning rings of exceptional points out of Dirac cones." Nature 525, no. 7569 (2015): 354-358.

Prerequisites:

  • General Physics
  • Optics and Photonics
  • Programming experience encouraged

Contact Name: Yi Yang

Contact Email: yiy@mit.edu


3/23/17

Summer

Department/Lab/Center: Sea Grant Program

Faculty Supervisor: T. Sapsis

Project Title: Assessing 20 years of mangroves productivity in the Caribbean

Project Description: The CARICOMP (Caribbean Coastal Marine Productivity) long-term program was developed to study processes at the land-sea interface and understand productivity, structure and function of the three main coastal habitats (mangroves, seagrasses and coral reefs) across the region. Together with biological monitoring, the CARICOMP network collected environmental data using standardized methods in these habitats, across the entire Caribbean basin. This environmental data was recently summarized and can be used to explore potentially associated changes in the productivity of mangrove communities during the past 20 years. Before this step, data quality assurance would be essential with further data visualization and basic analysis on seasonal and site productivity trends. This project would be appropriate for someone with interest in either gaining/expanding their knowledge on ecology and global changes, or in further developing skills in data processing and analysis that can be applied broadly.

Prerequisites: The most important attributes are interest in the project and reliability. Must have experience with handling and summarizing data in R or Matlab. The applicant is expected to work 40 h per week during the 10 week period during the summer, with possibility of expanding this work towards a senior project or equivalent requirement. Seeking applicants before April 13, 2017 unless interested in summer credits.

Contact Name: Carolina Bastidas

Contact Email: bastidas@mit.edu


3/23/17

Summer

Department/Lab/Center: Sea Grant Program

Faculty Supervisor: T. Sapsis

Project Title: Effects of ocean acidification on calcification of marine organisms

Project Description: Atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide (pCO2) increases since the Industrial Revolution has caused the acidity of surface seawater to decrease by 30% or 0.1 pH units. As increased pCO2 is largely due to anthropogenic use of fossil fuels and deforestation, seawater pH will likely decrease 0.3 0.4 units more by the end of this century. This, in turn, will result in a nearly 50% reduction in the carbonate ion concentration of seawater, making it more difficult for many calcifying organisms to produce or maintain their shells and skeletons. This research seeks to advance our understanding of the combined effects of pCO2 and temperature on critical aspects of shell/skeletal mineralization during the juvenile stage for three economically and ecologically important species of mollusks found in Massachusetts waters (oysters, scallops and mussels). This area has among the highest sensitivity to the potential effects of ocean acidification in the US due to its economic dependence on the shellfish industry and strong use of shellfish resources. Thus, understanding the impact of acidification on the early life stages of the mollusks that support these shellfish industries is our primary interest. At this point, our focus is to identify properties from skeleton surfaces (roughness, mineral density, structural pattern) that can readily account for those effects in calcification. This is being targeted through image analyses of stereo-pairs collected with TESCAN scanning electron microscope. Thus, working in this project you will gain experience in these techniques. Additional lab training is possible in: carbonate chemistry analyses, maintenance of living organisms in seawater, 3-D stereomicroscopy (to measure shell morphometric parameters), TESCAN and petrographic microscope (for analysis of ultrastructure and of shell/skeletal thin-sections).

Prerequisites: The most important attributes are interest in the project, motivation and reliability. Prior image analysis or Matlab experience is preferred. The applicant is expected to work 40 h per week during the 10 week period during the summer, with possibility of expanding this work towards a senior project or equivalent requirement. Seeking applicants before April 13, 2017 unless interested in summer credits.

Contact Name: Carolina Bastidas

Contact Email: bastidas@mit.edu


3/23/17

Summer

Department/Lab/Center: Media Laboratory

Faculty Supervisor: Hiromi Ozaki

Project Title: Electrical Engineering for Mind Control Microorganisms Through Galvanotaxis

Project Description: Looking for passionate EE engineers to work on a project translating the EEG signals from the brain to a system used to control the movement of microorganisms through an electric felid. We are looking for an EE student to design a circuit that controls electric fields.

Prerequisites: Must be fluent in electrical engineering. Experience designing and fabricating PCBs a must. Experience with programming for wearable sensors a plus, familiarity with microorganisms a plus. Must be able to devote 5+ hours a week and meet weekly. UROP for credit only.

Contact Name: Ani Liu

Contact Email: wonder@mit.edu


3/16/17

Summer

Department/Lab/Center: Biological Engineering (Course 20)

Faculty Supervisor: George Church

Project Title: Methods for Generalizable and Efficient Genome Editing using Viral Proteins

Project Description: Although CRISPR/Cas systems have achieved a lot of recognition for their ability to catalyze genome editing, the usefulness of those systems are limited by the repair machinery of the host. Cas9 acts like a pair of scissors, it can be used to cut the genome at a designed location and the cell uses it's own machinery to repair the cut, creating mutations, or precise changes if you supply template DNA. In many cases the repair machinery isn't efficient enough to introduce your desired template however, so having more efficient recombination proteins would be desirable to improve genome editing efficiency. From lambda phage, there are two proteins (Beta and Exo) that work together to efficiently catalyze DNA recombination in E. coli. They are commonly used in E. coli genetics to produce mutations and insertions, and even assist with genome reconstruction. However, these proteins are non-functional in most other bacteria or eukaryotic cells. I'm working on methods to study these proteins and expand their breadth of activity to allow them to be used across many other organisms and expand the repertoire of genome engineering tools.

Prerequisites: No course requirements. Passion about innovation, good work ethic, willingness to take risks.

Reference: http://www.nature.com/news/beyond-crispr-a-guide-to-the-many-other-ways-to-edit-a-genome-1.20388

URL: http://arep.med.harvard.edu/

Contact: Please email Gabriel Filsinger (filsinger@g.harvard.edu) with your CV and a brief introduction to apply.


3/16/17

Summer

Department/Lab/Center: Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research (MKI)

Faculty Supervisor: Herman Marshall

Project Title: Operating the X-ray Polarimetry Beamline

Project Description: The student will be trained to reconfigure, align, and operate the MIT X-ray Polarimetry Beamline in NE83. The beamline is used to validate components and optical design to be used in a rocket-based instrument to measure the X-ray polarization of astrophysical sources. The instrument is the first of its kind, which could determine the uniformity and direction of magnetic field in the jet emanating from a blazar, which has a supermassive black hole at its core. The student will learn to operate the X-ray source, the vacuum system, the X-ray detector, and its associated computer control system. Some data analysis and some hardware disassembly and reassembly will be involved as well.

Prerequisites: Experience with python and the linux operating system or with computer controlled mechanical systems are desirable.

URL: http://space.mit.edu/~hermanm/polarimeter/

Contact Name: Herman Marshall

Contact Email: hermanm@space.mit.edu